PUBLICATIONS
INTRODUCTION

Fishery Survey of India was established on 26th August 1946, as a Deep sea Fishing Station in post-war era to augment the fish production in the country. With the new horizon of fisheries development in the country the institute was assigned greater responsibilities of exploratory surveys and fish stock assessment during 1970s. Since then the institute has been engaged in exploratory survey of marine fishery resources in the Indian EEZ. The institute through its sustained efforts during the past has generated voluminous amount of data on the marine fisheries with information on stock size, resource composition, seasonality and biology. The information gathered is published in form of bulletins, charts, atlases, occasional papers and special publications. However, the publications, especially those published during the early period have been without abstracts and summaries. In order to easily access these publications by the end users this publication contains the abstracts of all such publications since inception of the institute.

Some of the earlier publications did not contain abstracts. For those publications abstracts have been prepared (marked *) and in case of publications already having abstracts by authors, such abstracts are reproduced in this volume.

1) Bulletins  :  Total 30 bulletins were published.

Bulletins

Bulletin No.1* (1974) DEMERSAL FISHERIES RESOURCES OFF NORTH-WEST COAST OF INDIA

Bulletin No.2* (1975) ANNUAL REPORT 1974-75

Bulletin No.3* (1976) DEMERSAL FISHERIES RESOURCES OFF THE SOUTH-WEST COAST OF INDIA.
Bulletin No.4* (1976) RESULTS OF EXPLORATORY FISHING CONDUCTED DURING 1975-76.
Bulletin No.5* (1976) RESULTS OF DEMERSAL FISHERIES RESOURCES SURVEY ALONG THE EAST COAST OF INDIA, 1959-74
Bulletin No.6* (1977) RESULTS OF EXPLORATORY FISHING CONDUCTED DURING 1976-77.
Bulletin No.7* (1978) RESULTS OF EXPLORATORY SURVEY AROUND THE ANDAMAN ISLANDS
Bulletin No.8* (1978) RESULTS OF EXPLORATORY FISHING CONDUCTED DURING 1977-78
Bulletin No.9* (1979) RESULTS OF EXPLORATORY FISHING CONDUCTED DURING 1978-79
Bulletin No.10* (1980) COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE DEMERSAL FISHERY RESOURCES OF THE INDIAN WATERS ASSESSED BY 17.5m TRAWLERS
Bulletin No.11* (1981) OBSERVATIONS ON THE FISH CATCHES OF SOME POACHING VESSELS RECENTLY INTERCEPTED ALONG THE NORTH-WEST COAST OF INDIA
Bulletin No.12* (1987) DEMERSAL FISHERY RESOURCES OF WADGE BANK
Bulletin No.13* (1984) PAPER 1. SALIENT OBSERVATIONS ON THE RESULTS OF FISHERY RESOURCES SURVEY DURING 1983-84
Bulletin No.14* (1986) PAPER 1. SOME OBSERVATIONS OF POTENTIAL FISHERY RESOURCES FROM THE INDIAN EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE (EEZ)
Bulletin No.15* (1986) A STUDY OF THE DEMERSAL RESOURCES OF THE WADGE BANK AND THE GULF OF MANNAR
Bulletin No.16* (1988) PAPER 1. FISHERY RESOURCES OF THE INDIAN EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO UPPER EAST COAST
Bulletin No.17* (1988) FURTHER STUDIES ON TUNA RESOURCES IN THE INDIAN EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE PAPER 1. TUNA RESOURCES OFF THE SOUTH-WEST COAST OF INDIA AS SURVEYED DURING 1986-87
Bulletin No.18* (1988) AN APPRAISAL OF THE MARINE FISHERY RESOURCES OF THE INDIAN EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE
Bulletin No.19* (1990) MARINE FISHERY RESOURCES OFF ORISSA-WEST BENGAL COAST
Bulletin No.20* (1990) MARINE FISHERY RESOURCES POTENTIAL IN THE INDIAN EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE - AN UPDATE
Bulletin No.21* (1991) MARINE FISHERY RESOURCES OFF THE LOWER EAST COAST OF INDIA
Bulletin No.22* (1992) FISHERY RESOURCES OF LAKSHADWEEP
Bulletin No.23* (1992) EXPLORATORY SQUID JIGGING IN INDIA WITH NOTES ON BIOLOGY OF SQUID PAPER 1. AN ACCOUNT OF EXPLORATORY SQUID JIGGING OFF WEST COAST OF INDIA
Bulletin No.24* (1992) PAPER 1. OBSERVATIONS ON THE DISTRIBUTION AND BIOLOGY OF INDIAN DRIFT FISH ARIOMMA INDICA (DAY) ALONG THE NORTH-EAST COAST OF INDIA
Bulletin No.25* (1995) MARINE FISHERIES RESOURCES OFF GUJARAT COAST
Bulletin No.26* (1998) CONTRIBUTIONS TO FISHERY BIOLOGY IN INDIAN SEAS

Bulletin No. 27 (2000) OCEANIC TUNA RESOURCES IN  THE NORTH-WEST REGION OF INDIAN EEZ

Bulletin No. 28 (2005) Fishery Resources of the Indian EEZ around Andaman and NicobaR Islands

Bulletin No. 29 (2008) depredation in the longline fishery of the indian waters
Bulletin No. 30 (2008) introduction of monofilament longline technology for harvesting oceanic tuna and allied resources in the indian eez

Bulletin No.1* (1974)

DEMERSAL FISHERIES RESOURCES OFF NORTH-WEST COAST OF INDIA

K.M. JOSEPH

Results of exploratory bottom trawling conducted by the Deep Sea Fishing Station, Bombay, along the Gujarat and Maharashtra coast, since its inception up to 1973 have been discussed in this bulletin. A large number of trawlers of different design, type and size were employed for the exploratory trawling, in the area between lat. 15N and 23 and long. 67E and 74E. Catch composition shows that the areas studied have several commercially important species. One of the important objectives of exploratory fishing was to assess the relative abundance of resources. Abundance indices were worked out for whole area by depth. Seasonal variation of the catch by nine classes of vessels in six regions in a year has been given in graphical form. An attempt has been made to determine the standing stock of demersal fish available in the continental shelf area under study. It is estimated that the fishery potential of demersal resources off Maharashtra coast from 25-50 m depth zone is about 1,20,000 t. whereas it is less in Gujarat. In Maharashtra coast, elasmobranches and dhoma alone accounted for about 50% of the catch. The study, without doubt, showed that demersal fisheries resources of the area could sustain the operation of a fairly large number of medium and large sized trawlers.

Bulletin No.2* (1975)

ANNUAL REPORT 1974-75

K.M.JOSEPH

An unexplored area of about 22,000 sq.km. within 30fm and about 2000 sq.km. between 30-100m depth were surveyed by operating 22 vessels. One of the significant features of the survey programme for 1974-75 was the demarcation made between exploratory and experimental fishing. Under experimental fishing eight 17.5m indigenously constructed vessels were conducting demersal trawling from Kandla,Bombay, Goa, Mangalore, Tuticorin and Madras; tuna long-lining and trolling were conducted from Port Blair and Kalava hand line fishing was introduced from Goa and Port Blair. Special shrimp survey programme was carried out from Visakhapatnam and Cochin. Results of these survey programmes are discussed. During the period of study the highest catch rate was observed from north-east zone. In depth-wise study it was noted that species abundance was high in the depth beyond 100 m. Cat fish, dhoma, ghol, eel. and karkara formed high percentage in the catch.

Bulletin No.3* (1976)

DEMERSAL FISHERIES RESOURCES OFF THE SOUTH-WESTCOAST OF INDIA.

K.M.JOSEPH, N. RADHAKRISHNAN AND K.P.PHILIP

Attempts made by the vessels of EFP to study the demersal resources off the south-west coast during the period 1957-1974 have been presented. The area of operation was between Lat.7N and 15 and long. 73E and 78E. and total study area was 80,000 sq.km. Eighteen vessels of varying sizes, horse power, tonnage etc. were employed in the survey. The distribution of sampling intensity in the areas of operation, the relative abundance of the demersal resources in general and of commercially important species in particular with refer ence to area, depth and time were analysed in detail and have been presented. Out of the total of 29,400 hrs. of actual fishing, about 65% was expended in areas within 20-39m. The intensity of sampling in 0-19m and 40-59m was of the order of 23% and 10% respectively of the total fishing effort. Analysis done with regard to the catch composition by depth and area revealed some interesting observations. The occurrence of prawns in abundant quantity has been noticed in areas below 20m; elasmobranchs in 40-59m; kilimeen and Lactarius in 20-39m and cat fish in 40-79m from the different regions studied, thus giving an idea of resources for future exploitation.

Bulletin No.4* (1976)

RESULTS OF EXPLORATORY FISHING CONDUCTED DURING 1975-76.

K.M.JOSEPH

The results of exploratory survey conducted by the project during 1975-76 are dealt with in the Bulletin. During this period of study the project operated 22 steel trawlers, out of which 19 were indigenously constructed 17.5m trawlers. These vessels were operated from eleven bases of the project viz., Kandla, Bombay, Goa, Mangalore, Cochin,Tuticorin, Madras, Visakhapatnam, Paradeep, Calcutta and Port Blair. The survey programme included demersal fisheries resources survey by conducting exploratory and experimental bottom trawling and "Kalava"hand line fishing and pelagic resources survey employing purse-seining,midwater trawling, tuna longlining and trolling. In addition special shrimp survey programme was also conducted from Goa, Mangalore,Cochin, Visakhapatnam and Paradeep. The details of fishing methods and gear employed in the survey, and relative abundance of resources in general and of commercially important species in particular with special reference to area, depth and time have been discussed.

Bulletin No.5* (1976)

RESULTS OF DEMERSAL FISHERIES RESOURCES SURVEY ALONG THE EAST COAST OF INDIA, 1959-74

K.M.JOSEPH, N. RADHAKRISHNAN, ANTONY JOSEPH AND K.P. PHILIP

The results of fishery resources survey conducted by the Exploratory Fisheries Project during the period 1959-74 in the east coast of India between lat. 8N and 22N and long. 78E and 90E are presented in the Bulletin. Twenty four vessels of varying horse power were employed for the survey. The relative abundance of demersal fisheries resources along the lower and upper east coasts has revealed that the catch rate of prawns appeared to be negligible in almost all areas surveyed off Madras and that of perches ranged from 2 to 49 kg/hr with relatively high abundance in the southern part of the lower east coast. The monthly variation in the catch rates of important fishes is presented indicating the peak occurrence of different species along the lower and upper east coast. The present study, in contrast to earlier belief, has shown that the upper east coast is more productive than the lower east coast and total potential yield from the shelf area is likely to be much more than what has been estimated by earlier workers.

Bulletin No.6* (1977)

RESULTS OF EXPLORATORY FISHING CONDUCTED DURING 1976-77.

M.SWAMINATH

This Bulletin brings out the highlights of results of exploratory fisheries surveys conducted during 1976-77 in the area between Lat.7oN-20N and Long.76E-88E by various classes of vessels of the project.During the period an area of about 46,000 sq.km. was surveyed and about 1806 tonnes of shrimps and fish were landed. The percentage composition of commercially important species inthe trawl catches obtained from different regions was studied. Of all the bases of west coast, the percentage of ranifish was the highest in Mangalore. Perches and elasmobranchs constituted about 2/3rd of the catch in Tuticorin region whereas leiognathids, elasmobranchs, perches and pomfrets were the main groups obtained from Madras. Relative abundance of resources and monthly variation of catch rate of important species have been discussed. North-west coast and lower east coast were found to be yielding more than other regions. Tuna long lining from Port Blair yielded average hooking rate of 3.8% which is viable for commercial operation.

Bulletin No.7* (1978)

RESULTS OF EXPLORATORY SURVEY AROUND THE ANDAMAN ISLANDS

D.SUDARSAN

Results of survey conducted by three vessels using different fishing methods around the Andaman Islands, form the basis of this bulletin. During the period, a total of 2420.3 hrs. of fishing effort was expended. Among five methods of fishing adopted, about 50% of effort was put in by bottom trawling, which indicates the scope for this method in Andaman and Nicobar waters.Leiognathids,sciaenids, upenoids, elasmobranchs, cat fish and perches are the major components of the catch. The seasonal abundance of catches show that the period from October to March was generally more productive than other periods. Among fishing methods adopted longlining, trolling and hand line for Kalava yielded better results. Stock assessment of demersal resources based on swept area method is made. The standing crop is worked out to be 2.78 t/sq.m.The total standing crop of demersal resources is assessed in the order of 44,576 m.t. which is about 10 times of the figures arrived at by earlier authors.

Bulletin No.8* (1978)

RESULTS OF EXPLORATORY FISHING CONDUCTED DURING 1977-78

M.SWAMINATH

Results of fisheries resources survey conducted by the Project during the year 1977-78 are discussed in this bulletin. Twenty two essels conducted demersal fishery resources survey from twelve bases. During the course of survey the vessels landed 1,134 tonnes of fish and prawns. The composition of trawl catch, the relative abundance in each area and bathymetrical and seasonal fluctuations of important groups have been analysed for each region. In the west coast Kandla region was found to yield 269 kg/hr constituting elasmobranchs as the major component of catch in the month of May. The main components of trawl catch obtained in east coast were perches, rays and sciaenids, which were found to yield better catch in July-August months. The depth range between 20-30m was comparatively more productive than other depths. Longlining and trolling also yielded encouraging results.

Bulletin No.9* (1979)

RESULTS OF EXPLORATORY FISHING CONDUCTED DURING 1978-79

M.SWAMINATH

During the year 1978-79 with 23 vessels of varying specifications an area of about 39,000 sq.km. was surveyed by bottom trawling and pelagic trawling, and by other diversified fishing methods such as purseseining, tuna longlining and trolling from selected bases an area of 3,000sq.km. was covered. The results of these surveys are discussed in the Bulletin. The results show that in west coast elasmobranchs formed the dominant group while cat fish constituted major catch in the east coast. Relative abundance of important varieties in the different geographical divisions and depth zones and seasonal variation with respect to quality and quantity of catch are also discussed. Along Bombay region the productive zone is between 30-39m depth and highest yielding months are December and February. In the east coast, Visakhapatnam region registered good catch and 60-69m is identified as productive zone.Highest catch rate recorded was in January. Purse-seining, long lining,trolling and mid water trawling are also attempted and the results are promising.

Bulletin No.10* (1980)

COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE DEMERSAL FISHERY RESOURCES OF THE INDIAN WATERS ASSESSED BY 17.5m TRAWLERS

K.M.JOSEPH

This Bulletin presents a comprehensive picture of demersal fisheries resources along the Indian coast from the data gathered by 17.5m trawlers operated from 11 bases during the period 1970-71 to 1979-80. The data obtained on CPUE, seasonality and species composition are presented in the form of charts, diagrams and tables to make it easily discernable. In the west coast, depth upto 80m yielded highest catch rate with cat fish as the dominant group whereas in the east coast depth range between 20-60m shows highest catch rate of perches and leiognathids. The potential yield of demersal fish resources from within 75m depth based on swept area method is estimated as 16,79,000 tonnes.

Bulletin No.11* (1981)

OBSERVATIONS ON THE FISH CATCHES OF SOME POACHING VESSELS RECENTLY INTERCEPTED ALONG THE NORTH-WEST COAST OF INDIA

K.M.JOSEPH

This Bulletin brings out an account of species composition in the catch of 8 confiscated Taiwanese trawlers poaching in north west coast of India and that of project vessel, Matsya Nireekshani and other commercial vessels operating in the same area, which reveals that the poaching vessels fished mainly along Saurashtra region. The difference in the percentage composition of some species such as squid and cuttle fish among the catch of different vessels is attributed to the mode of operation of the poaching vessels and it is inferred that these foreign vessels are fishing in relatively deeper and distant waters during day time and in shallow waters during night. High incidence of cuttle fish and squid (28%) in the catches of Taiwanese stern trawlers lend support to the preliminary findings of the project that there exist potential resources of cephalopods along the north-west coast.

Bulletin No.12* (1987)

DEMERSAL FISHERY RESOURCES OF WADGE BANK

K.M.JOSEPH, P.SULOCHANAN, M.E.JOHN, V.S.SOMVANSHI,

K.N.V.NAIR AND ANTONY JOSEPH

Demersal resources of Wadge Bank, of which area measures about 3600 sq. miles, was studied during the period between October 1981 - April 1983. The demersal trawler Matsya Nireekshani under took altogether 17 cruises of average 20 days duration operating 669 hauls in the area, expended 1407 hrs. of actual sampling. Analysis of percentage composition reveals that highest percentage of perches is obtained from north-east region, while Nemipterids dominate in south-west, west and eastern regions. Depthwise analysis shows that threadfin bream exhibits a clear trend of higher density with increasing depth upto 128-183m. Cephalopods and carangids showed declining trend with increasing depth. Conspicuous seasonal variation in yield pattern was observed in almost all species. Perches recorded high catch rate during third quarter with maximum yield in August. An exceptionally high catch rate (167.7 kg/hr) was recorded in March 1983 from the south-east region in 183-223m depth suggesting better scope for further exploitation.

Bulletin No.13* (1984)

PAPER 1. SALIENT OBSERVATIONS ON THE RESULTS OF FISHERY RESOURCES SURVEY DURING 1983-84

K.M.JOSEPH

Surveys carried out by Fishery Survey of India vessels in different regions of EEZ forms the basis for this paper. Information regardingnew demersal resources such as Bulls eye, Indian drift fish, black ruff,deepsea lobster and deepsea prawns along both the coasts in addition to exploited resources are brought out. Deepsea resources exploration reveals that deepsea lobster Puerulus sewelli occurs along the west coast from Gulf of Mannar to Karwar and deepsea prawns such as Heterocarpus spp. and Aristeus spp. were found to occur along Kerala-Karnataka coast in the depth range 200-500m. Results of longline and purse-seine survey are also presented.

PAPER 2. A NOTE ON THE DEMERSAL FISHERY RESOURCES SURVEY OF GULF OF MANNAR

V.S.SOMVANSHI AND P.K. BHAR

During 1983 the FSI survey vessel, Matsya Nireekshani, operating from Tuticorin Base, surveyed five major areas viz., 7-78, 8-78, 8-79, 9-78 and 9-79 in the Gulf of Mannar. Results of the survey is discussed in the Bulletin. The main groups/species supporting the demersal fishery in Gulf of Mannar were Barracuda, Perches, Elasmobranchs, Carangids, and Pomfret. The study has shown that the depth ranges between 0-50m and 101-200m are the most productive areas. The deepsea lobster Puerulus sewelli is available throughout the depth belt of 150-500m in Gulf of Mannar in varying quantities. The deepsea prawn Solenocera hexti is also caught from Gulf of Mannar in varying quantities. Sepiellainermis, Sepia pharaonis and S.aculeata constitute the cephalopods occurring upto 200m depth. Thus, Gulf of Mannar offers high scope for demersal fishery resources developement in the region.

PAPER 3. OBSERVATION ON THE DEMERSAL FISHERY RESOURCES ALONG ANDHRA PRADESH COAST

T.V.NINAN, S.P. BASU AND A.K.BHARGAVA

The results of the survey carried out during 1983-84 by the survey vessel Matsya Shikari, between lat. 14oN and 18oN upto 500m depth along the east coast are discussed here. During the period the vessel conducted 617 hrs. of actual fishing and landed 176 tonnes of fish. The results of survey indicate that the area 17-82 is the most productive area, registering a catch rate of 815.98 kg/hr. Analysis of depth-wise and month-wise catch reveals that 71-90m depth zone yields higher catch and that February is the most productive season. Sardine registered 18.48% of catch along the Andhra coast.

PAPER 4. A NOTE ON THE DEEPSEA DEMERSAL RESOURCES OFF KARNATAKA-NORTH KERALA COAST

K.P.PHILIP, B.PREMCHAND, G.K. AVHAD AND P.J.JOSEPH

Results of the survey carried out by FSI vessels Matsya Shakti and Matsya Vishw during 1983-84 are dealt with in this paper. The area between Lat.10N to 15N and Long.70E to 76E within 50-500m depth had been systematically surveyed using 27m fish trawl and 47m shrimp trawl and totally 314 tonnes of fish was landed. Species composition reveals that Nemipterids dominate the catch. A gradual increase in catch rate with increase of depth is observed during the survey. Variation in catch rate by month is also observed. The highest overall catch rates were obtained during the months of April (289.02 kg/hr) and May (241.89 kg/hr). 

PAPER 5. SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE TUNA RESOURCES OF INDIAN OCEAN

K.K.VARGHESE, M.E. JOHN AND V. SHIVAJI

Results of 12 months survey from April 1983 with distribution of sampling in the Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal and North west Indian Ocean by Matsya Sugundhi, the tuna long liner attached to Cochin Base form the basis for this paper. Altogether 83,000 hooks were operated and the aggregate hooking rate recorded is 2.27%. Results show that the continental shelf waters are richer than the equatorial sea. The maximum hooking rate of 5% is recorded in the area 10-74, situated north west of Cochin. The catch consisted of three species of tunas, viz., Bigeye tuna, yellowfin tuna and skipjack tuna, forming 25% of the total catch. Among billfishes which made up 9.4% of catch, striped marlin and Indian sail fish, are the more frequent ones. Pelagic sharks represent 64.2% of catch. Though equatorial waters give better harvest rate for yellowfin and bigeye tunas, the bill fishes and skipjack tuna yield higher rates from east coast.

Bulletin No.14* (1986)

PAPER 1. SOME OBSERVATIONS OF POTENTIAL FISHERY RESOURCES FROM THE INDIAN EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE (EEZ)

K.M.JOSEPH

During the exploratory surveys conducted in the deeper waters some of the fish resources were found to have significant scope for commercial exploitation which has been accounted in the paper. Demersal resources like carangids, perches, nemipterids, cat fishes, lizard fishes, lesser sardine, mackerel, squids, cuttle fish and barracuda have scope for commercial exploitation. Non-exploited stocks such as Bulls eye and black ruff form the mainstay of the deepsea resources in the outer continental shelf. Horse mackerel, decapterids, mackerel and lesser sardines offer scope for purse seining/midwater trawling. The hooking rate for yellowfin tuna obtained during thesurvey indicated that the catch rates are reviving in the Indian Ocean and is feasible for commercial exploitation.

PAPER 2. PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS ON TUNA RESOURCES OF THE ARABIAN SEA WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO DISTRIBUTION PATTERN OF YELLOWFIN TUNA

P.SULOCHANNAN, M.E. JOHN AND K.N.V. NAIR

Some areas within the Indian EEZ are found to be highly productive with encouraging hooking rates for tuna. The catch indices in the area surveyed during the survey period for all tuna together and separately for yellowfin tuna were 1.54% and 1.43% respectively. These figures are considerably higher than that of the hooking rate recorded by Japanese (0.23%), Korean (0.62%) and Taiwanese (0.17%) long liners during late seventies. Present study shows that hooking rate for tuna is between 0.36% and 3.06% which is a positive indication for the feasibility of tuna exploitation from Indian waters.

PAPER 3. KEY TO SPECIES OF FISHES OBTAINED IN THE TRAWL CATCHES OF VISAKHAPATNAM

D.SUDARSAN

Perceiving the importance of correct identification of fish specimens, this paper presents a dichotomous key to a total of 273 species belonging to 166 genera from 81 families known to occur in the trawl catches of Visakhapatnam. The study has taken note of the numerous taxonomic revisions in recent years resulting in many nomenclatural changes.

Bulletin No.15* (1986)

A STUDY OF THE DEMERSAL RESOURCES OF THE WADGE BANK AND THE GULF OF MANNAR

T.E.SIVAPRAKASAM

Demersal resources survey of Wadge Bank and Gulf of Mannar were carried out by the FSI vessel, Matsya Nireekshani during October 1981-April 1983 and October 1983-March 1985 respectively. Analysis of data on relative abundance shows that in the case of Wadge Bank the catch per hour is relatively less (98.6 kg/hr) compared to Gulf of Mannar (133 kg/hr). Perches gave catch rate of 19.8 kg/hr in Wadge Bank and 24.8 kg/hr in Gulf of Mannar. Relative abundance in relation to depth strata reveals that in Wadge Bank, 100-200m depth zone yields highest catch rate in contrast to Gulf of Mannar, where 20-50m depth yields highest catch rate. Observation of seasonal variations indicated that in Wadge Bank January and February gives the highest catch rate while in Gulf of Mannar it is December. Present study gives an opportunity to calculate the biomass in the study area. In Wadge Bank total biomass in 20-200m depth with regard to area 7-77 and 8-77 works out to 38.663 tonnes, while in Gulf of Mannar in the same depth range it is 24.114 tonnes.

Bulletin No.16* (1988)

PAPER 1. FISHERY RESOURCES OF THE INDIAN EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO UPPER EAST COAST

D.SUDARSAN AND V.S. SOMVANSHI

This paper deals with recent knowledge gained through survey of demersal, midwater/pelgic and oceanic resources. Nine vessels were deployed for resources survey in the upper east coast. The data collected during 1980-86 have been analysed in respect of each of fishing techniques/methods. Survey operations yielded information on 3 types of resources in the upper east coast. (a) conventional resources (b) conventional resources beyond trawl fishing grounds, that would be exploited from extended depth (c) non-conventional resources available at deeper waters. Purse seine operation results show availability of varied types of pelagic resources. Catch composition includes sciaenids, Decapterus spp., clupeids, mackerels, cat fish, carangids, pomfret and perches.Deeper waters beyond 200m depth gave non-conventional species of fish (Centrolophus niger, Priacanthus spp.) and deepsea prawns belonging to the genus Aristeus, Heterocarpus, and deepsea lobster Puerulus sewelli. The resource picture reveals that varied resources are available in our EEZ, for exploitation through diversified fishing techniques.

PAPER 2. OFFSHORE, DEEPSEA AND OCEANIC FISHERY RESOURCES OFF KERALA COAST

P.SULOCHANAN AND M.E. JOHN

Among the maritime states in India, Kerala occupies foremost position in marine fish production contributing about 23% of the totalfish production in the country. Preliminary investigation of deepsea demersal resources along the coast undertaken by the FSI vessel Matsya Nireekshani shows that standing stock per unit area in the outer self and slope of lat. 8 and 9N were higher than that of inner shelf. Some of the major resource components were Nemipterids (35%) and within 200m, cat fish (22%) from 50-100m zone. Large perches consisting mainly serranids, lutjanids and lethrinids formed 9.17% of catch from the continental shelf. Squids and cuttle fish accounted for 7.5% of demersal catch from the shelf area off Kerala coast. Deepsea prawns and deepsea lobsters reported from Quilon Bank falling in Lat. 8N indicated average catch rate of 14.72 kg/hr. In the Wadge Bank region perches are most prominent in the catch. Nemipterids form the second major group contributing 23.8% followed by rays (10.1%), cephalopods (6.6%) and carangids (5.7%). The survey revealed that pelagic shoals were available mainly within 60m depth.

PAPER 3. INDIAN EEZ - AVAILABILITY OF RESOURCES AND MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF DEEPSEA FISHING INDUSTRY

D.SUDARSAN AND T.E. SIVAPRAKASAM

The extension of the legal regime of the oceans upto 200 nautical miles marked an important milestone in the socio-economic development of coastal nations. Availability of fish resources based on an assessment of the total biomass, current fish production and net available potential yield, is basic requirement for planning fishery development programmes. The Fishery Survey of India has made promising efforts in the area of experimental and exploratory fishing. Based on the earlier as well as present studies, the paper assesses that at the present rate of exploitation the following number of additional vessels can be introduced in Indian EEZ. About 3000 mechanised boats upto 50m coastal belt, about 1000 deepsea vessels for the exploitation of demersal and pelagic resources in the offshore and deepsea beyond 50m and about 500 vessels including tuna long liners, purse seiner, pole and liners in the oceanic waters.

Bulletin No.17* (1988)

FURTHER STUDIES ON TUNA RESOURCES IN THE INDIAN EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE PAPER 1. TUNA RESOURCES OFF THE SOUTH-WEST COAST OF INDIA AS SURVEYED DURING 1986-87

T.E.SIVAPRAKASAM AND D. SUDARSAN

Results of tuna longline survey by the vessel Matsya Sugundhi of FSI during 1986-87 along the south-west coast of India are presented in the paper. The survey covered the EEZ area between Lat.5-15N and Long.69-79E. Altogether 88200 hooks were operated. The average hooking rate for all fish and tunas were 7.69% and 5.64% respectively. Higher hooking rate was apparent in higher latitudes. The hooking rates obtained for each 1 Lat. x 1 Long. square and also for each latitude are presented. Analysis of seasonal variation showed that the hooking rate varied from 1.26% to 15.15% with highest rates in February, April and December. A general increase in catch rate was observed from September to May. Catch composition showed that tunas formed 73.36% of catch (by number) followed by sharks 20.92%, bill fishes 4.98% and other fishes 0.72%. Among tunas, yellowfin tuna formed 98%. The survey confirmed availability of commercial concentrations of tunas and tuna-like fishes off the south-west coast. 

PAPER 2. TUNA RESOURCES OFF THE EAST COAST OF INDIA AS REVEALED BY CHARTER OPERATIONS

M.E. JOHN, S.M. PATIL AND V.S.SOMVANSHI

One of the developmental measures adopted by the Government of India to promote deepsea and oceanic fishing in Indian EEZ was to permit Indian entrepreneurs to operate foreign fishing vessels under charter scheme. Results of such chartered longliners engaged in tuna fishing off the east coast of India during 1985-88 are discussed. The vessels were of 41-47m OAL and operated from Madras as the port of call. The voyages were of 3-4 months duration. Altogether 14 voyages were made covering a total of 731 voyage days with 594 fishing days and aggregate fishing effort of 12.5 lakh hooks. Effort per fishing day was 1400-3000 hooks by different vessels. Main area of operation was between Lat.13-18N. The total catch declared was 1098.3 tonnes with an average catch of 1.85 tonnes per fishing day. The major constituents (by weight) were yellowfin tuna 40.2%, marlin 32.4% and sword fish 9.6%. The mean catch rate obtained for all fish and yellowfin tuna were 88 kg/100 hooks and 35.4 kg/100 hooks respectively. The yellowfin tuna hooking rate (by number) worked out to 1.07%. January-April was the main fishing season.

Bulletin No.18* (1988)

AN APPRAISAL OF THE MARINE FISHERY RESOURCES OF THE INDIAN EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE

D.SUDARSAN, T.E.SIVAPRAKASAM, V.S.SOMVANSHI, M.E.JOHN,

K.N.V.NAIR AND ANTONY JOSEPH

India is a maritime State with rich endowment of living and non-living resources. The marine fish production has registered a growth rate of 3.5% for number of years and the present production is about 1.8 million tonnes. The continental shelf and slope upto 300m depth is calculated as 4,38,545 sq.km. (excluding Lakshadweep and Andaman &Nicobar islands). The present study on the marine fishery resources is based on the data collected by FSI vessels and attempts to assess the quantum of resources from presently unexploited grounds outside 50m depth upto 300m in the case of demersal resources and upto EEZ boundary in respect of oceanic resources. It is indicated that along the westcoast the stock density was found to be high in the 40-80m depth belt, but a progressive increase in abundance with increase in depth was noticed in lat. 20N and 21N. In certain pockets very high mean densities were obtained from northwest and southwest coasts in the 100-150m and 150-200m depth ranges. A progressive increase in abundance of resources with increase in depth upto 100m depth and declining trend thereafter was observed along the east coast.

Bulletin No.19* (1990)

MARINE FISHERY RESOURCES OFF ORISSA-WEST BENGAL COAST

M.E.JOHN, AND D. SUDARSAN

Orissa and West Bengal are among the maritime States which have registered relatively high level of growth rate in marine fish pro duction during VI & VII Plans. These States contributes about 2.95% and 2.86% respectively of marine fish production in the country. Results of fishery resources survey conducted by FSI survey vessels during 1969 to 1987 in Orissa and West Bengal coast are discussed in the paper. The area-wise trawl survey effort, catch composition, CPUE (kg/hr) and estimate of stock of demersal resources are given in tabular form. Total MSY estimated for Orissa coast is 125.6 thousand tonnes comprising of 85.3 thousand tonnes of demersal and 40.3 thousand tonnes of pelagic resources. For West Bengal total MSY is estimated as 119.1 thousand tonnes consisting of 87.8 thousand tonnes of demersal and 31.3 thousand tonnes of pelagic resources. The major stocks available for future exploitation are elasmobranchs, cat fish, sciaenids, mackerel, silver belly,perches, pomfrets, horse mackerel and sardines.

Bulletin No.20* (1990)

MARINE FISHERY RESOURCES POTENTIAL IN THE INDIAN EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE - AN UPDATE

D.SUDARSAN, M.E. JOHN AND V.S. SOMVANSHI

This Bulletin attempts to provide refined estimates of fishery resources potential in Indian EEZ enabling to develop deepsea fishing and to manage the deepsea fish stocks on a rational basis. The MSY of demersal resources from the continental shelf and slope upto 500m depth is about 1.93 million tonnes, of this, 1.78 million tonnes is expected from within 50m depth contour and 0.65 million tonnes from deeper waters. Coastwise, the potential along west coast including Lakshad weep has been assessed as 1.25 million tonnes from deeper waters. The total potential yield of pelagic resources over the continental shelf is estimated to be 1.74 million tonnes. About 63% of the estimated stocks is on the west coast, 25% on the east coast, 4% in Lakshadweep and 8% in Andaman & Nicobar waters. The pelagic resources in the offshore region beyond 50m depth is mainly formed of coastal tunas, ribbon fishes, horse mackerel and pelagic sharks. These are among the least exploited resources in Indian seas.

Bulletin No.21* (1991)

MARINE FISHERY RESOURCES OFF THE LOWER EAST COAST OF INDIA

T.E.SIVAPRAKASAM, P.S.PARASURAMAN, B. PREMCHAND,

S.A.RAJKUMAR AND G. NAGARAJAN

The lower east coast of India between lat.8N and 16N has a coastline of about 1340 km and shelf area of about 41,400 sq.km. The results of demersal resources survey carried out by 17.5m vessels in Gulf of Mannar during 1971-80 show that perches were the most import ant resources forming 36% followed by sharks and skates. There were two distinct seasons for fishing viz., January to April and July to October. The demersal resources of Wadge Bank upto 300m depth, surveyed by the vessel Matsya Nireekshani, showed that Perches and file fish (Balistids) formed about 50-60% of the catch upto 100m depth. Deepsea resources including Nemipterus spp. and Priacanthus spp. reach maximum concentration in 100-200m depth. Carangids were available in all depth zones upto 200m and the depth range 100-200m yielded the high catch rate of 175.3 kg/hr. In latitude 12N South of Madras, the catch rate was found to increase steadily with increasing depth reaching highest figure of 267 kg/hr in 200-300m depth. Carangids, silver bellies,mackerel and scad dominated the catch in 0-50m depth. In Lat.15N, 0-50m depth zone was dominated by silver bellies (30.4%) followed by perches and carangids. Pomfret was dominant with 18.6% in the depth range 50-100m followed by ribbon fish and Centrolophus spp. Pria canthus spp. dominated the 100-200m depth zone forming 56.9% of catch. The oceanic resources of Coromandal coast between lat. 10N and 15N upto 200 n.mile EEZ were surveyed by the vessel Matsya Harini by tuna longlining in which, mostly Yellowfin occured in all the areas. Hooking rates showed that the areas surveyed were feasible for further development on tuna fishery.

Bulletin No.22* (1992)

FISHERY RESOURCES OF LAKSHADWEEP

P.SIVARAJ, M.E. JOHN AND T.E. SIVAPRAKASAM

The Union Territory of Lakshadweep comprises a cluster of 10 inhabited islands and 17 uninhabited islands with a total land area of 28.5 sq.km. between lat. 8 and 1230'N and long. 71 and 74E. The annual marine fish production in the islands fluctuated between 2896 tonnes to 7298 tonnes during 1979-88 period with average of 4820 tonnes. Pole and line is the predominant fishing method and skipjack tuna is the major component of the catch. The FSI has done extensive tuna longline survey in the Lakshadweep sea from the vessel Matsya Sugundhi during 1983-88. Highhooking rate of yellowfin tuna has been reported. Areawise and season wise results of the survey are presented. The trawl survey vessel Matsya Varshini conducted bottom trawling in the Basses de Pedro Bank, and the results are discussed in the Bulletin. Besides finfishes, the archipelago is endowed with resources like sea cucumber and octopus. On future prospects of developing fisheries, it is emphasized that the unexploited tuna resources should be exploited by commercial operation, employing large purse-seiners, pole and line and longline vessels.

Bulletin No.23* (1992)

EXPLORATORY SQUID JIGGING IN INDIA WITH NOTES ON BIOLOGY OF SQUID

PAPER 1. AN ACCOUNT OF EXPLORATORY SQUID JIGGING OFF WEST COAST OF INDIA

K.N.V.NAIR, T.V. NINAN, P.J. JOSEPH AND N.JAGANNADH

Demersal resources surveys carried out by FSI have revealed existence of potential grounds for cephalopods all along the India coast. A diversified fishing method viz., squid jigging was introduced by FSI for exploration of the squid resource. This paper presents the results of squid jigging conducted off the south-west coast by the tuna longliner-cum-squid jigging vessel Matsya Sugundhi during June 1988 to May 1989. Limited squid jigging operations were also attempted on board of a trawler Meena Prapi along the Gujarat coast. Methodology of squidjigging and details of instrumentation are described. The vessel Matsya Sugundhi conducted jigging for neritic squids between lat. 8N and 17N in the depth range 25-200 m and for oceanic squids between lat. 10N-14N in areas beyond 500m depth. Month-wise and area-wise results are discussed. Results of biological studies undertaken in respect of different species of squids viz., Loligo duvauceli, Doryteuthis spp. and Symplectoteuthis spp. are also presented in the paper.

PAPER 2. BIOLOGY OF SQUIDS

K.P.NAIR, M.M. MEIYAPPAN, P.S.KURIAKOSE, P. SARVESAN, A.P.LIPTON, S. MOHAMED, P.K. ASOKAN, M. JOSEPH AND D.NAGARAJA

Biology of squids obtained in squid jigging along the west coast between lat. 8-17N are presented in the paper. The depth of operation was in range of 20-200 m. The squids taken in the jigging survey belong to three genera, viz., Loligo, Doryteuthis and Symplectoteuthis. Studies on size composition, sex ratio, maturation and length-weight relationship of the three genera of squids are discussed. Dorsal mantle length of male Loligo duvaucelli ranged from 50 mm to 310 mm. Females were smaller in length, ranging between 50 mm -230 mm. The length frequency of males indicated the model size as 125 mm and the females showed multimodal or bimodal distribution. The rate of increase in weight in relation to length was found to be different in sexes. In Doryteuthis spp. males had multimodal distribution and females had bimodal distribution with modes in range of 145-156 mm. The male-female ratio was 66:34. In Symplectoteuthis oualaniensis males had a size range of 80-190 mm, and females 80 -250 mm. Squids within the length range of 100-200 mm contributed 99% of the total number. The smallest size of mature male was 90 mm and that of mature female 100 mm. Males outnumbered females with a sex ratio of 36: 64. Further, it is observed that species of above three genus can be attracted by artificial light and be jigged without affecting juvenile population. If the method is found economically feasible, it will be the most ideal fishing method for harvesting of squids.

Bulletin No.24* (1992)

PAPER 1. OBSERVATIONS ON THE DISTRIBUTION AND BIOLOGY OF INDIAN DRIFT FISH ARIOMMA INDICA (DAY) ALONG THE NORTH-EAST COAST OF INDIA

P.PAUL PANDIAN AND K.P. PHILIP

Ariomma indica is a neritic deep water fish occurring all along the Indian coast. Exploratory survey by Fishery Survey of India indicated occurrence of this species in 50-150 m depth in east coast and 50-100 m depth in the west coast. The distribution pattern and biology of the stock along the north east coast are presented in this study. The data collected by bottom trawl survey on board the FSI vessel Matsya Darshini during the period 1988-90 are used. The length-weight relationship was estimated separately for males and females. Length frequency distribution indicated a single mode in most of the samples. Sex ratio showed predominance of males. Fecundity was estimated as 66,680 ova per fish. Distribution pattern of the species showed occurrence upto 140 m depth and that 50-100 m depth zone yielded higher catch rates.  The highest catch rate was observed in the month of February.

PAPER 2. OBSERVATION ON DEMERSAL RESOURCES SURVEY BETWEEN LAT.7N AND 11N ALONG SOUTH-WEST COAST, WADGE BANK AND GULF OF MANNAR DURING 1988-90

T.V.NINAN, V. SIVAJI, N. JAGANNADH AND L. RAMALINGAM

The results of demersal resources survey between lat. 7N and 11N along the south-west coast, Wadge Bank and Gulf of Mannar by the vessel Matsya Nireekshani during April 1988 to March 1990 are presented in this paper. The survey was conducted following stratified random sampling. The depth range was 30-500 m and total sampling effort was 3080 hours.  The variability in catch composition and CPUE with reference to latitudes, depth zones and seasons are discussed. The biomass of the demersal stocks of south-west coast was worked out to be 83,200 tonnes. In the Wadge Bank and Gulf of Mannar the biomass was estimated as 89,200 tonnes and 16,190 tonnes respectively. Estimates of Maximum Sustainable Yield are also given in the paper.

PAPER 3. A STUDY ON THE FOOD AND FEEDING HABITS OF YELLOWFIN TUNA (THUNNUS ALBACARES) CAUGHT IN ANDAMAN WATERS OF INDIAN EEZ BY TUNA LONGLINING  

K.VIJAYAKUMARAN, P.S. PARASURAMAN, S.A. RAJAKUMAR AND

G. NAGARAJAN

A study is made on the food and feeding habits of yellowfin tuna obtained in long line gear from Andaman waters. A total of 188 speci mens were examined for gut content analysis. It was observed that the average weight of stomach contents per yellowfin tuna was 106 gm, comprised of 93.43% prey, 3.8% semi-digested food and 2.8% digested  matter. The food intake of males was observed to be higher than that of females. Prey consumed per day and per year by one yellowfin tuna was estimated as 507 gm and 185 kg respectively which is composed of deepsea fishes 13.5%, other teleosts 25.4%, cephalopods 30.8% and crustaceans 30.3%.

PAPER 4. STUDIES ON MESH SELECTIVITY OF 27.5 M BOTTOM TRAWL OPERATED BY M.V. MATSYA JEEVAN

T.E.SIVAPRAKASAM, K.VIJAYAKUMARAN, P.S. PARASURAMAN

AND S.A. RAJAKUMAR

The results of a study on trawl mesh selectivity by covered codend method are presented in this paper. The study was carried out during July-August 1988 on board the FSI survey vessel Matsya Jeevan engaged in fishery resources survey along Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh coasts. A 27m trawl net with codend of 40 mm mesh size covered by loosely fitted cover of 20 mm mesh size was used for the study. The species studied were Nemipterus japonicus, Saurida tumbil, Decap terus russelli, Secutor insidator, Gerres setifer, Upeneus vittatus, U.sulphureus and Sphyraena obtusata. Selection ogive was obtained for each species by plotting the percentage retention in the codend for each length against the length of fish. The selection factor was determined for all the eight species.

PAPER 5. TUNA RESOURCES, COSTS AND EARNIGS FROM TUNA LONGLINERS

K.VIJAYAKUMARAN, A. ANROSE AND J.E. PRABHAKAR RAJ

Though Indian waters have huge tuna resources, the fishing industry is yet to enter in the field of exploitation, perhaps due to the reason that economic feasibility of such ventures have not been worked out. This paper tries to analyse the economic aspects taking into consideration of capital and variable costs, cost benefit ratio, discounted cash flow and percentage of return. The catch projections are based on the results of tuna longlining by 14 chartered foreign vessels operated in Indian EEZ. The capital and operating costs of a 36.5m longline survey vessel of FSI, with appropriate adjustments, formed the basis of economic analysis. The cost and earning analysis of one vessel for one year showed a cost benefit ratio of 0.683, gross profit ratio of 0.794 and the net profit ratio of 0.285. The project pay out period worked out to be 1.39 years. The Net Present Value is highly positive (+ 6389330) which shows that the project is economically viable.

Bulletin No.25* (1995)

MARINE FISHERIES RESOURCES OFF GUJARAT COAST

A.K.BHARGAVA, S. VARGHESE, V.V.NAIK AND M.E.JOHN

Among the maritime states of India, Gujarat has longest coastline and widest shelf area. Coastal upwelling during south-west monsoon and  the heavy run off from Sabarmati, Tapti and Narmada rivers cause enrichment of inshore areas which sustain some of the major commercial fisheries in the region. This Bulletin presents an account of the marine fishery resources survey conducted along Gujarat coast (lat. 20N to 23N) upto 1992 by different types of vessels and gear. Northern areas off Dwarka and Kutch were the most productive areas comparable with richest fishing grounds of the world. Demersal resources survey carried out by M.T. Murena during 1977, Matsya Nireekshani during 1979-80 and 1991-92, Matsya Varshini during 1979-80 and Matsya Mohini during 1986-92 showed that Gujarat coast has potential for Sharks, catfishes, perches, pomfrets, sciaenids, polynemids, seer fishes, clupeids, squids and cuttle fishes. Estimation of biomass and stock density showed that highest density of 11.3 tonnes/sq.km was observed within the same depth in lat. 23N. 67% of the total biomass estimated was in the inshore waters upto depth of 50 m. Maximum sustainable yield 81.6% was noticed in 0-50m depth and this shows that Gujarat coast is fertile for exploitation of pelagic and demersal resources.

Bulletin No.26* (1998)

CONTRIBUTIONS TO FISHERY BIOLOGY IN INDIAN SEAS

V.S.SOMVANSHI AND M.E. JOHN (EDS.)

PAPER 1. STUDIES ON SOME BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF STRIPED GOAT FISH UPENEUS VITTATUS (FORSKAL) FROM NORTH-EAST COAST OF INDIA

D.M.ALI AND K. GOPALAKRISHNAN

This paper presents some aspects on the biology of Upeneus vittatus from the north-east coast. The von Bertalanffy growth parameters are derived as Loo = 214 mm, K = 0.63 and t= -0.05. The mortality coefficients obtained are Z = 3.6 and M = 0.8. Sex ratio indicates predominance of females. The length-weight relationships worked out are :

Males           Log W = -4.7983 + 3.2071 Log L

Females       Log W = -5.4934 + 3.4285 Log L

PAPER 2. SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE LENGTH-WEIGHT RELATIONSHIP, SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND SEX RATIO OF DEEP SEA LOBSTER, PUERULUS SEWELLI (RAMADAN)

P.PAUL PANDIAN AND G.K. AVHAD

The length-weight relationship, size distribution and sex ratio of the deep sea spiny lobster. Puerulus sewelli from the south-west coast were investigated. The length and weight measurements were found to be best fitted by the equation   W = aLb and the relationships derived are as follows :

Male W = 0.0103 L2.9625             Female W = 0.0107 L2.9402           Combined W = 0.0101 L2.9702

The size of the lobster ranged from 104 to 192 mm in total length. The female to male ratio was 1:1.29.

PAPER 3. FOOD AND FEEDING HABITS OF PRIACANTHUS HAMRUR (FORSKAL) FROM THE UPPER EAST COAST OF INDIA

K.P.PHILIP

A study of the food and feeding habits of Priacanthus hamrur from the upper east coast of India revealed that it is a carnivorous species feeding on crustaceans and teleost fishes. About 60 percent of the identifiable food items was constituted by crustaceans like alima, squilla,crabs, prawns and euphausiids. Bregmaceros spp. and eel were the dominant teleost fishes. Seasonality in the abundance of food components was studied. Diversity of food was less in fishes from deeper waters. Young fishes showed a marked preference to small crustaceans. Feeding intensity was high during January to June and low during July to December. Condition factor showed good relation with the feeding intensity than maturation. A comparative study of the food items of P.hamrur and Nemipterus japonicus showed a good degree of overlap in the food items.

PAPER 4. STUDIES ON FOOD AND FEEDING HABITS OF UPENEUS MOLUCCENSIS ALONG NORTH-WEST COAST OF INDIA

A.K.BHARGAVA AND V.S. SOMVANSHI

Goat fishes of the family Mullidae are of economic importance and form a minor fishery along Indian coast. Upeneus moluccensis is the dominant species among red mullets occurring along the north-west coast. The study on food and feeding habits indicates that shrimp forms the main food of U. moluccensis. The younger specimen consumes juvenile fishes and crabs also. The fishes above 14 cm length feed actively when compared to the smaller specimen.

PAPER 5. MATURITY AND SPAWNING OF THE CAT FISHARIUS THALASSINUS (RUPPELL) OFF THE NORTH-WEST COAST OF INDIA

MANALI A. PARAB

The maturity cycle of Arius thalassinus is described. The ripeova measure 15-18 mm in diameter, size at first maturity is 36.0 cm. The fish breeds once a year during April to August. The females are predominant with a male to female ratio of 1:1.23. Fecundity varies between 34 and 88 ova per female. Parental care is exhibited by males.

PAPER 6. SOME ASPECTS ON THE REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY OF YELLOWFIN TUNA THUNNUS ALBACARES IN THE BAY OF BENGAL

M.E.JOHN, M.NEELAKANDAN, V.SIVAJI, B.PREMCHAND, P.S.

PARASURAMAN, M.K.SAJEEVAN AND P.SIVARAJ

Some aspects on reproductive biology of yellowfin tuna obtained in longline gear from the Bay of Bengal are discussed. Males are predominant with a sex ratio of 2.45:1. In larger fish above 140 cm length the male dominance increases drastically and above 160 cm length all fish are males. The trend in sex ratio was consistent in all seasons with significant level of chi-square values. The maturity cycle, studied with reference to gonad index and group maturity index, indicates that the species spawns mainly during November to April. Comparison is made with the spawning season of the species reported from different regions of Indo-Pacific Ocean.

PAPER 7. LENGTH-WEIGHT RELATIONSHIP OF PRIACANTHUS HAMRUR OCCURRING ALONG THE NORTH WESTERN INDIAN EEZ

S.VARGHESE

Length-weight relationship of Priacanthus hamrur from the north-west coast of India is estimated. The result obtained shows that value of the exponent `b' is 2.6285 for males, 2.8803 for females and 2.7810 for both sexes combined. The growth of the species is allomet ric. The resutls are compared with the length-weight relationship of different species of Priacanthids occurring in the south-east Asian waters.

PAPER 8. PRELIMINARY STUDIES ON BIOLOGY OF ACROPOMA JAPONICUM (GUNTHER 1859) : (PISCES, PERCIFORMES, ACROPOMATIDAE)

S.K.NAIK AND D.E.UIKEY

Acropomatids are deepsea fishes sometimes found in the demersal catches beyond 100 m depth along continental shelf. Acropoma japonicum caught from the central west coast of India during March-April 1996 has been used for this study.The specimens were found in size range of 9.6-14.0 cm weighing 8-34 gm. The length-weight relationship is W = 0.020416 L2.748689. The sex ratio 1:5.43, was observed to be significantly different (X2 = 64.066 : 0.05 : df = 133) in favour of females. Males dominated among smaller individuals and females in the larger size groups. The fecundity ranged from 471 to 5331 eggs with an average of 208 eggs per gram body weight. Small prawns are the main food item of these fishes.

PAPER 9. OBSERVATIONS ON MATURITY AND SPAWNING IN INDIAN SCAD, DECAPTERUS RUSSELLI (RUPPELL, 1830) ALONG NORTH-WEST COAST OF INDIA

A.V.TAMHANE AND V.S. SOMVANSHI

Indian scad Decapterus russelli belonging to family carangidae is a commercially important fish. It breeds once in a year with a prolonged spawning season. Spawning season starts in June and continues upto December. Minimum size at first maturity determined is 13.5 cm. The sex ratio (M:F) for the entire period of study is 1:1.2. The females were found to be dominant during the study period.

Bulletin No. 27 (2000)

Oceanic tuna resources in the North-West region of Indian EEZ -     K. Govindaraj, M.E. John, Premchand, N. Unnikrishnan, Jocab Thomas and V.S. Somvanshi

 Oceanic tunas and allied stocks form a major resources base for augmenting marine fish production from the Indian EES. In order to generate a sound information base to facilitate utilisation of these resources, Fishery Survey of India has been conducting survey of the deep swimming larger pelagics by tuna longlining. This bulletin contains the results of survey undertaken on board the vessel Yellow Fin along the north-west coast of India during 1996-98.

Bulletin No. 28 (2005)

Fishery Resources of the Indian EEZ around Andaman and Nicobar Islands -     M.E. John, A.K. Bhargava, S. Varghese, D.K. Gulati, Ashok S. Kadam and S.K. Dwivedi

The Andaman and Nicobar Islands are located in the southern Bay of Bengal between latitude 6°45' N and 13°41' N and longitude 92°12' E and 93°57' E. The total coastline length is 1962 km, which is about one fourth of the coastline of India. The Exclusive Economic Zone around the islands encompasses an area of 0.6 million km2 forming about 30 percent of the Indian EEZ.

Fisheries form one of the major natural resources of the islands. Over 1200 species of fishes are known to occur in the island waters.

Though a number of development schemes had been proposed by various expert groups and task forces in the past. Concreted efforts are yet to be made and the fishery resources in the Andaman and Nicobar waters by and large remain under exploited.

Fishery Survey of India had carried out exploratory survey of demersal, neritic, pelagic and oceanic resources in the Andaman and Nicobar water by diversified methods. The surveys during the past three decades have provided very valuable information on the composition and magnitude of harvestable resources in the EEZ around the island groups.

This Bulletin provides updated information on the marine fishery resources in Andaman and Nicobar waters based on resources surveys carried out so far. The resource potential is reassessed and developmental prospects are also discussed.

Bulletin No. 29 (2008)

Depredation in the Longline fishery of the Indian waters  -   S. Varghese, V.S. Somvanshi and Sijo P. Varghese.

Depredation of fishes caught on the pelagic long line gears is a global phenomenon calling attention of the Scientists and the fishermen community to address the issues related to it at national and global level.  The depredation data collected during the survey cruises of the tuna long line vessels of the Fishery Survey of India during the period 2000-06, were analysed and the area-wise depredation rate in the three regions of the EEZ, the Arabian Sea, Andaman and Nicobar waters and East Coast, in respect of the depredated cruises, depredated sets and for the entire operation is calculated and presented.  The depredation rate calculated for the depredated cruises for the Indian EEZ is 2.76% (by number of fishes) and the value in relation to the predated sets is found to be about 16.23% (by number).  No specific trend in depredation is observed during different years and months as the index was of varying nature.  The depredation rate is also not found to have any direct relevance to the gear type, i.e., monofilament or multifilament gear.  The most affected species are the tunas, swordfishes, sailfishes and seer fishes.  Almost all species hooked on the lines were found to be subjected to depredation, but in varying proportion.  The depredation therefore does not appear to be species-specific or time-specific either.  Among the three different regions, the depredation rate is found to be higher in Andaman and Nicobar waters for the depredated cruises (2.99%), followed by Arabian Sea (2.57%) and Bay of Bengal (2.08%).  Similarly the index for the depredated sets was found to be 17.06% for Andaman and Nicobar waters, 14.15% for the Arabian Sea and 12.5% for Bay of Bengal.

Bulletin No. 30 (2008)

Introduction of Monofilament Longline technology for harvesting oceanic tuna and allied resources in the Indian EEZ  -   V.S. Somvanshi, S. Varghese and Sijo P. Varghese.

Exploration of deep seas for locating and prospecting new resources, by introduction of new technologies, helps the coastal nations in enhancing their fish production.  With the objective of introducing and popularising monofilament longlining technology in the Indian waters and training the Indian fishermen in this specialised fishing technique, the FSI has acquired two monofilament long liners named Matsya Vrushti and Matsya Drushti which are deployed for survey in Arabian Sea along the West coast and in Bay of Bengal and Andaman and Nicobar waters along the East Coast, within the Indian EEZ respectively.  In order to evaluate efficiency of the modern monofilament gear with reference to that of the conventional multifilament gear a comparison of the two gears during the above period is attempted in this Bulletin.  Besides providing spatio-temporal variations, an attempt has been made to present information on size and weight of individuals of each species with regard to the monofilament caught vis-à-vis conventional multifilament hooked individuals.  The results of monofilament long line survey conducted in the Arabian Sea along West coast during 2005-07 registered an aggregate HR of 1.01% for all fish and 0.37% HR for yellowfin tuna, where 40% of the total catch consisted of this species.  The spatial distribution of tunas and allied species has shown a higher hooking rate in latitudes beyond 18oN.   The area 22-67 of lat. 22oN recorded a very high HR of 10.5% for all fishes and 10.4% for YFT alone.  The seasonality of yellowfin tuna along this coast is observed to be from April-December, the peak months being April, May and August.  The surveys along East coast (Bay of Bengal) yielded a HR of 1.01% for all fishes during 2005-06 and 0.85% during 2006-07.  The average HR for YFT was 0.41%, and 51.5% of the catch was constituted by tunas.  The seasonal variation in the HR show that the period June to December is good season for tuna fishing along the East Coast.  The spatial distribution of yellowfin tunas along the East coast has indicated that some of the areas of high HR for YFT are 13-80 (0.9%), 15-82 (0.71%), 16-82, 16-83 (1.2% each) and 17-83 (0.88%).  Both the vessels together achieved an average hooking rate of 0.93% during the two year period in the Indian EEZ.  A comparison of the results of operation of the multifilament long lining undertaken by the two vessels Yellow Fin in the Arabian Sea and Blue Marlin in the Bay of Bengal show that the hooking rate obtained in monofilament longlining was higher.  An increase in the aggregate HR in general and for the tunas in particular with a significant reduction in the HR of sharks was noticed during the monofilament operations.  However the proportion of very large size fish was noticed to be higher in the multifilament gear which could be attributed to the deeper depth, these gear occupy and the behavioural tendency of large fish to swim to deeper depths.

 
2) Special publications: Special publications consists of gears operated, fish stock assessment,
                                        bibliography of tuna fisheries etc. Total 5 publications were published.

Spl. Publication No.1* (1979)

TRAWL GEAR OPERATED BY EFP

M.SWAMINATH, MOHAMED ROSHAN AKTHAR, M.K.R. NAIR,

M.E. JOHN, ANTONY JOSEPH AND S. VARGHESE

This publication deals with the designs of trawl nets operated by different classes of vessels of Exploratory Fisheries Project since its inception in 1946. Description of various part of net with important details on construction are given. Data and construction drawing of different sizes of two seam fish trawls and four seam shrimp trawls, along with details of vessels and otter boards with which the nets were operated are specified. During the period otterboards of different shapes were used by the project vessels, especially conventional flat type and recently introduced oval type. The drawings with specific measurements along with rigging patterns are presented. Cost particulars of different size of trawl nets and a glossary of technical terms are also given.

Spl. Publication No.2* (1989)

STUDIES ON FISH STOCK ASSESSMENT IN INDIAN WATERS

PAPER 1. POPULATION DYNAMICS AND ASSESSMENT OF TRICHIURUS LEPTURUS LINNAEUS STOCK IN NORTH-WEST COAST OF INDIA

V.S.SOMVANSHI AND ANTONY JOSEPH

Ribbon fish forms an important component of fish landings along the north-west coast. Results of studies on population parameters and stock assessment of Trichiurus lepturus Linnaeus based on material collected in the survey conducted by the vessel M.T. Murena in the year 1977 are presented. The analysis gave growth parameters Loo as 109 cm and K as 0.64. The instantaneous natural mortality co-efficient, M and total mortality co-efficient Z, estimated for the species were 0.8 and 2.16 respectively. Analysis of variance carried out to know the geographical,bathymetyrical and seasonal influence on the CPUE of the species indicates that the abundance is not influenced by seasons and it should be studied by three spatial divisions, viz., (i) Lat. 15-18N, (ii) Lat. 19-27 20N and (iii) Lat. 21-23N and also to be segregated for the depth ranges 50-100m and 100-200m. The biomass and MSY of ribbon fish assessed for north-west coast are 156 thousand tonnes and 70 thousand tonnes respectively.

PAPER 2. SOME CONSIDERATION ON THE POPULATION DYNAMICS OF YELLOWFIN TUNA THUNNUS ALBACARES (BONNATERRE) IN INDIAN SEAS

M.E.JOHN AND K.S.N. REDDY

Results of a study on population dynamics of yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares in Indian seas based on data collected in longline survey is presented in the paper. The survey covered oceanic waters of the Indian EEZ and adjacent areas, during 1983-88. Length-weight relationship of yellowfin tuna is described as W = 0.000049557 L 2.8055. The von Bertalanffy parameters obtained are Loo = 175 cm and K = 0.29. Natural mortality coefficient is estimated as 0.74. In view of data limitations the results are considered only as prefatory.

PAPER 3. ESTIMATES OF STOCK DENSITY, BIOMASS AND MAXIMUM SUSTAINABLE YIELD OF PRIACANTHUS HAMRUR (FORSKAL) OFF THE NORTH WEST COAST OF INDIA

R.S.BIRADAR

Bottom trawl surveys were carried out off the northwest coast of India between 15N to 22N latitudes covering 3 depth strata viz; less than 50 m, 50-100 m and 100-200 m, during 1984-1987. The stock density of Priacanthus hamrur varied in the different depth zones and quarters. The depth zone 50-100 m was more productive as compared to less than 50 m depth. The stock density was highest during October to December and lowest during July to September. The total biomass of P. hamrur was estimated to be 88,560 tonnes, with maximum sustainable yield of 25,000 tonnes per annum. During monsoon (July - September), the stock density as well as the chance of encountering the species were low, indicating possible movement or migration of the stock. The distribution of stock in relation to hydrographic parameters over time and space may throw further light on the hypothesis of movement or migration.

PAPER 4*. POPULATION DYNAMICS AND STOCK ASSESSMENT OF THE CUTTLE FISH, SEPIA PHARAONIS (EHRENBERG) IN WADGE BANK

K.P.PHILIP AND D.M. ALI

An attempt is made in this paper to estimate population parameters and stock size of S. pharaonis in the Wadge Bank based on trawl survey conducted by FSI. Using von Bertalanfy plot Loo and K are calculated as 37.0 cm and 0.5 year-1. Total mortality Z is estimated as 1.1. Total Biomass of 2060 tonnes of S. pharonis is estimated from this area.

PAPER 5. BIOMETRIC COMPARISON OF SAMPLES OF THE CARANGID FISH CARANGOIDES MALABARICUS (BLOCH & SCHNEIDER) FROM TWO LOCALITIES OF THE EAST COAST OF INDIA

A.SHAMEEM

Samples of Malabar Trevally, Carangoides malabaricus from Kakinada and Waltair on the east coast of India are compared using chi- square test for meristic characters and multivariate analysis for morpho metric characters. Six meristic characters and six body measurements were analysed.

PAPER 6*. TRENDS IN DRIFT GILLNET FISHERY OFF KOCHI WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO EFF INPUTS AND RETURNS DURING 1981-82 AND 1986-87. IN : STUDIES ON FISH STOCK ASSESSMENT IN INDIAN WATERS 

A.A.JAYA PRAKASH

The paper presents an account of the drift gill net fishery at Cochin from 1981 to 1987. The annual catch/effort showed upward trend from 93 kg in 1982 to 176 kg in 1987. The major group of fishes that contributed to the fishery during 1981-87 were tunas and bill fishes (37.8%), seer fishes (19.1%), elasmobranchs (4.4%), cat fishes (13.4%), carangids (5.5%), pomfrets (5.3%) and mackerel (1.6%).

PAPER 7*. A STUDY OF THE STOCK OF PRIACANTHUS HAMRUR (FORSSKAL) DURING MARCH AND SEPTEMBER BETWEEN LAT.11-16N ALONG THE WEST COAST OF INDIA

K.VIJAYAKUMARAN AND S.K. NAIK

Analysis of abundance with respect to the latitude and different depth ranges during the lean fishing season using STATGRAPICS is attempted in this paper. No significant different between the average catch rate observed for March and September which indicates it is a single stock fishery. Total estimated biomass for the month of March and September are 24014.59 tonnes and 27598.52.

PAPER 8. INFERIOR CONDITION OF MULLETS FROM POLLUTED WATERS OF VISAKHAPATNAM HARBOUR

B.RAM BHASKAR, K. SRINIVASA RAO, D. PANDURANGA RAO AND

Y.V.K. DURGA PRASAD

The condition factor (q) of comparable length groups of mullets (Mugil cephalu and Liza macrolepis) from Visakhapatnam inner harbour  (polluted site) and from Gostani estuary, Bhimilipatnam (control site)  were estimated. The condition factor was found to be much lower in the case of mullets from harbour waters than that of mullets from Gostani estuary. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the ln W (ln mean weight) with the corresponding ln L (ln mid-point of length group) as covariate showed significant difference between mullets of the two waters. Low condition factor of the fishes from the harbour waters which is due to high concentrations of heavy metals, oil and grease in the waters, affecting the well-being of the fishes.

 

PAPER 9*. GILLNET SELECTIVITY OF HILSA ILISHA (HAM.BUCH.) IN THE HOOGLY - MATLAH ESTUARINE SYSTEM

S.K.MANDAL

The study present a hypothetical example of two selection curves imposed on the data to demonstrate the effect of selection.  

 

PAPER 10. APPLICATION OF SWEPT VOLUME METHOD IN PELAGIC STOCK ASSESSMENT OF MEGALASPIS CORDYLA

(LINNAEUS) ALONG NORTH-WEST COAST OF INDIA

ANTONY JOSEPH AND V.S. SOMVANSHI

The paper presents results of detailed analysis of data on horse mackerel, Megalaspis cordyla, collected during six cruises of the vessel M.T. Murena along the north-west coast in 1977. The results indicate certain behavioural characteristics of this pelagic species : (i) occurrence in large schools in surface layer upto 200m depth, (ii) schooling in high densities during night and (iii) congregation of schools vulnerable to pelagic trawls during 0000-0400 hours. The species was found to be abundant during January - March. A new concept of assessment of biomass by `swept volume' is suggested for assessing the pelagic stocks. Pelagic trawl surveys with acoustics would be the inputs in this method. The limitations of this method due to variations in catchability coefficient, associated with shoaling habit and migration of small pelagics are discussed.

Spl. Publication No.3* (1992)

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON TUNA FISHERIES IN THE INDIAN SEAS

M.E.JOHN AND A.K. BHARGAVA

Tunas and tuna-like resources are the potential resources available for exploitation in the Indian seas. In this publication scientific papers and other documents on tuna published in India are compiled for the benefit of researchers. The references included are on fishery, biology, population dynamics, exploratory surveys, commercial fishing, distribution and development prospects of tuna fisheries.

Special Publication No. 4 : Bibliography of FSI publications (October 1998)

Special Publication No. 5 : Abstract of FSI publication (May 2000)

 

3) Occasional papers: Total 10 occasional papers were published relating to different research   
                                      activities.

Occasional paper 1* (1986)

ON THE LOCATION OF LARGE SHOALS OF RAINBOW

RUNNER ELAGATIS BIPINNULATA (CARANGIDAE) OFF CAPE COMERIN

T.E.SIVAPRAKASAM AND G. NAGARAJAN

During the survey cruise in February 1985 the purse-seining vessel Matsya Varshini of FSI located a large shoal of Rainbow Run ner, Elagatis bipinnulata. A successful haul made in the area 7-77 yielded a total catch of 10.7 tonnes out of which E. bipinnulata account ed for 7 tonnes. The occurrence of this species is of interest as this was not recorded earlier to form such large shoals. The species is known to occur in warm coastal waters upto 50-60 m depth and grows to about 4 feet length. The main fishing methods for this species are by hook and line, gill nets and seine nets.

Occasional paper 2* (1986)

POTENTIAL TRAWL FISHERY FOR MACKEREL OFF ORISSA AND WEST BENGAL COASTS

T.E.SIVAPRAKASAM

The Indian mackerel, Rastrelliger kanagurta (Cuvier), forms the most important fishery in India next to oil sardine. In the present paper,some interesting observations on mackerel resource along the Orissa-West Bengal coast obtained in bottom trawl survey by the vessel Matsya Darshini during the year 1985 are analysed and presented. The catch obtained by the vessel during the period was 145 tonnes, of which mackerel formed 56 percent. The distribution pattern and seasonal varia tion in abundance of the species ar  discussed. Depth-wise, 101-150 m depth zone yielded the highest CPUE of 210.2 kg/hr followed by 51-100 m zone with a catch rate of 94.1 kg/hr. The results reveal that the mackerel resource abounds in offshore/deeper waters than the coastal belt. The occurrence of mackerel in trawl catches along the Orissa- West Bengal coast in substantial quantities portends the existence of a potential trawl fishery for mackerel in the region.

Occasional paper 3* (1987)

RESULTS OF EXPLORATORY TUNA LONGLINE SURVEY CONDUCTED IN THE ARABIAN SEA OFF SOUTH-WEST COAST OF INDIA DURING 1985-86

T.E.SIVAPRAKASAM AND S.M. PATIL

This paper presents information on distribution and abundance of tunas and tuna-like fishes off south-west coast of India, obtained in tuna longline survey by the vessel Matsya Sugundhi during the period from May 1985 to March 1986. The survey covered the EEZ area along west coast from lat. 5N to 14N. The total hooking rate varied from 0.4% to 23.9%.Tunas were the most important component (75%) followed by sharks and billfishes. Three species of tunas were obtained in which yellowfin tuna dominated the catch to the extent of 99%. The hooking rate for tunas varied from 0.16% to 20.81% with an average of 6.09% for the whole year. Highest catch rates were obtained off Karnataka coast within the EEZ. The study revealed a northerly migration of the tunas from lower latitudes to higher latitudes which starts from October and extends upto March. Prospects of development of tuna fishery in India are also discussed in the paper.

Occasional paper 4* (1986)

WHAT IS IN STORE IN THE DEEP SEA? RESULTS OF EXPLORATION INTO THE DEMERSAL FISHERY RESOURCES OF THE INDIAN EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE

T.E.SIVAPRAKASAM

A synoptic view of demersal fishery resources in the Indian EEZ upto 500 m depth, as revealed in exploratory surveys by larger vessels of FSI during 1979-86 are discussed in the paper. The information is presented in terms of relative abundance of resources obtained in various depth ranges and latitudes, and the percentage composition of dominant species in each depth range on a state-wise basis. The type of resources available, area of availability and depth zone of abundance are identified. The major resources in the deepseas beyond 70 m depth are threadfin breams, bulls eye, black ruff, drift fish, scad, green eye, horse mackerel, mackerel, ribbon fish, barracuda, lizard fish, squid and cuttle fish, deepsea lobster, deep sea shrimps, deep sea shark and crabs. It is suggested that economic viability of utilisation of the deepsea resources is to be examined. However, with the increasing demand and near maximum utilisation of coastal resources we will have to turn to deepsea resources in future.

Occasional paper 5* (1988)

PURSE-SEINING EXPERIMENTS WITH LIGHT ATTRACTION OFF THE EAST COAST OF INDIA

T.V.NINAN AND D. SUDARSAN

Attraction and concentrating pelagic fishes by artificial light is practised in different parts of the world. Various factors such as positive phototaxis, preference for optimum light intensity, investigatory reflex, defensive reflex etc. are attributed to fish aggregation. This behaviour of fish was exploited in the light attracted purse-seining conducted on board the trawler-cum-purse-seining vessel, Matsya Darshini of FSI and the results are presented in this paper. It was observed that the fish was attracted in the areas where turbidity was more and currents were strong. There were indications that the bigger fishes such as seer fish, skipjack tuna etc. were not directly attracted by light but converged to feed on aggregated small fishes like sardines and anchovies, attracted by light.

Occasional paper 6* (1991)

SPEAR LOBSTER, LINUPARUS SOMNIOSUS, BERRY & GEORGE, 1972 (FAM. PALINURIDAE) IN THE ANDAMAN SEA

D.M.ALI, P.P. PANDIAN, V.S. SOMVANSHI, M.E. JOHN AND K.S.N.REDDY

The spear lobster Linuparus somniosus is known to occur off the East African coast. The first record of occurrence of the species in  Indian waters is reported in this paper. The FSI survey vessel, Matsya Shikari during her maiden voyage to Andaman sea located the  resource on 9-10-1990. The species was again caught in the second cruise during March-April 1991. The distribution range as observed during the two cruises is between lat. 1140'N to 1310'N and long. 9253'E to 9308'E in the eastern Andaman Sea in the depth range 279-360m. The haul- wise CPUE obtained was in the range of 0.54 to 4.83 kg/hr. Biological studies showed that the total body length was in the range of 16-42 cm. Average weight was 351 gm and the maximum weight 1010 gm. The male to female ratio was found to be 60.7:39.3. Length-weight relation ship was estimated as W = 0.0449 L 2.6877. Length frequency studies indicated multi modal distribution pattern with four components. Prospects of commercial exploitation of the stock in the Andaman & Nicobar waters are also discussed in the paper.

Occasional paper 7* (1994)

SOME OBSERVATIONS ON DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF DEEPSEA SHRIMPS ALONG THE SOUTH-WEST COAST OF INDIA AS REVEALED BY CHARTERED FOREIGN FISHING VESSELS OPERATIONS

A.K.BHARGAVA, M.E. JOHN AND V. RANE

Operation of some of the chartered stern trawlers along the south-west coast, targeting on deepsea shrimps, has yielded valuable information on abundance and distribution of the stock. The results of fishing by two Italian vessels and one Spanish vessel during the period 1990-1994 are discussed. Large number of species of deepsea shrimps, belonging to Fam. Penaeidae and Fam. Pandalidae, occur off the south-west coast.The commercially important species are listed in the paper. It was observed that the chartered vessels operated mainly in two distinct fishing grounds in lat.9N and 10N, situated off Alleppy and Ponnani in 340-430m depth range. The fishing pattern and stock distribution are described. The mean catch per unit obtained was 852.7 kg per fishing day or 50.1 kg per fishing hour. Monthwise CPUE does not indicate seasonality of any significant magnitude and suggests feasibility of round the year fishing. Successful operation by vessels from distant nations is a pointer to economic viability of exploitation. However, in view of slow growth and high mortality rate of deepsea shrimps cautious approah is needed for long term exploitation.

Occasional paper 8* (1995)

TWO NEW RECORDS OF BRAMID DEEPWATER OCEANIC POMFRETS, TARACTICHTHYS LONGIPINNIS (LOWE, 1843) AND TARACTES RUBESCENS (JORDON & EVERMAN, 1887) FROM THE ARABIAN SEA AND BAY OF BENGAL.

K.N.V.NAIR, V.SIVAJI AND V.S. SOMVANSHI

During the survey cruise of the tuna longline vessel Blue Marlin undertaken for surveying oceanic resources in the north-west coast of India, a specimen of Tractichthys longipinnis was hooked from the area lat. 2235' N and long. 6714' E off Porbandar at 2375 m depth on 22-1-1990. Another species, Taractes rubescens, was recorded off Little Andaman at 2245 m depth on 19-12-1991. Description, synonyms and distribution pattern of these species, along with the economic importance have been discussed in this paper.

Occasional paper 9* (1996)

SUNFISHES (FAMILY: MOLIDAE) CAUGHT FROM THE NORTH WESTERN INDIAN EEZ

V.S.SOMVANSHI, S. VARGHESE, R.K. GUPTA AND V.V. NAIK

The sunfishes distributed in tropical and temperate parts of the World Ocean are rare in their occurrence along the Indian coast. The species reported from Indian waters are Ranzania truncata, R. typus, Masturus Ianceolatus, M. oxyuropterus and Mola mola. The Fishery Survey of India vessel Yellow Fin during her longline operations along the north west coast of India during May, October and November 1992 hooked 8 specimens of the species Mola mola and one specimen of M. lanceolatus, from the areas along lat. 19-22N, having bottom depth range of 1152 to 1937 m. A review of the literature shows that very limited information is available on the biological aspects of the sunfishes especially on their mode of reproduction and place of breeding. All the five specimens examined during the present investigation were males having immature and mature gonads. The information on their food habit shows that they feed on a variety of food items ranging from jelly fish to sea weeds indicating the nonselective nature of feeding.The sunfishes have no commercial importance as their flesh is not considered as a favoured food, being tough, unpalatable and insipid.In Japan, the liver extract from the ocean sunfish M. mola has been employed as a crude remedy for the treatment of human gastric ulcers.Since the sunfishes are rarely encounted near the continental shelf, the specimens reportedly caught in the past could be mere incidental catches or landed having drifted to shore. Several myths and legends are associated with sighting of the sunfish. A recent research study shows that green sunfish has the ability to see through murkey condition at sea. The present study provides a comprehensive account of the information in respect of sun fishes including their general distribution, phylogeny, key to the genera and species, certain biological aspects,morphometric measurements, meristic counts, food and gonad condition.

PROCEEDINGS

TUNA RESEARCH IN INDIA (1993)

D. SUDARSAN AND M.E.JOHN

For fisheries development it is a prerequisite to take stock of scientific evidence and to summarise and update the understanding of the resources in the region. As a step in the direction of tuna fisheries development in Indian seas a colloquium of experts involved in tuna research in India was organised during 1992. The colloquium facilitated interaction of scientists to identify the research needs and chalk out an outline of programme of research work for future. Ten invited papers covering various aspects on tuna research were presented. The papers were reviewed after discussions in the colloquium. In this volume these papers are presented in final form. The papers included in this publication are :

Paper 1

Tuna research in India : present status and future approach. 

D.Sudarsan

Paper 2

Fishery and biology of yellowfin tuna occurring in coastal fishery in Indian seas.

P.P.Pillai, K.P.Said Koya, N.G.K.Pillai and A.A.Jayaprakash

Paper 3 :

Fishery and biology of yellowfin tuna occurring in oceanic fishery in Indian sea.

M.E.John and D.Sudarsan

Paper 4

Density indices of yellowfin tuna in Indian seas as observed in longline surveys.

M.E.John

Paper 5

Fishery, biology and stock assessment skipjack tuna in Indian Seas.

T.M.Yohannan, P.P.Pillai and K.P.Said Koya

Paper 6

Big eye tuna in the seas around India.

M.E.John and D.Sudarsan

Paper 7

Fishery, biology and stock assessment of small tunas.

P.S.B.R.James, G.Gopakumar, Mohammed Kasim, M.Sivadas and

K.P.Said Koya

Paper 8

Effect of environmental fluctuations on coastal tuna

fisheries.

M.S.Rajagopalan, P.S.B.R.James and N.G.K.Pillai

Paper 9 :

Satellite remote sensing for tuna fishing in Indian waters.

Beena Kumari, Mini Raman, A.Narain and T.E.Sivaprakasam

Paper 10

Patern of spatial and seasonal fluctuations in temperature

profile in Indian EEZ and its influence on tuna fishing.

K.N.V.Nair and P.M.Muraleedharan

Paper 11:

Results of the tuna tagging programme conducted in the

Maldives during 1990.

M.Yesaki and A.Waheed

 

TECHNICAL REPORT

 Technical Report - SAC/RSA/RSAG/MWRD/TR/01/92 May

1992

REMOTE SENSING OF MARINE FISHERIES : STATE OF THE

ART CUM INDIAN EXPERIENCE

A. NARAIN, BEENA KUMARI, H.V. SOLANKI, R.M. DWIVEDI,

NEERA CHATURVEDI, AND MINI RAMAN

(Space Applications Centre)

D. SUDARSAN, T.E. SIVAPRAKASAM, AND M.E. JOHN

(Fishery Survey of India)

Remote sensing techniques have been widely used in marine fisheries in many countries on an operational basis for resources survey and exploitation. In India studies on aplication of remote sensing in marine fisheries was started with the collaborative efforts by ISRO, CMFRI and FSI, as a Joint Experiment Programme during 1979-1984.

These studies have ultimately reached the stage of generation of Potential Fishing Zones (PFZ) forecasts based on SST data from the NOAA-

AVHRR sensor.

The objective of this report is to describe the methodology in the

fishery forecast besides giving an introduction to the field of remote

sensing. Specific case studies also have been presented on feature related application of sea surface temperature to fishery resources.

 

Special Publication No.5

OF FSI PUBLICATIONS

A. K. Bhargava and J. C. Dhas

 

May 2000

 

Fishery Survey of India

Government of India

(Ministry of Agriculture)

Mumbai-400 001

 

Published by Dr.V.S.Somvanshi, Director General, Fishery Survey of

India, Botawala Chambers, Sir P.M.Road, Mumbai-400 001

Fax : 022-22702270

Phone :22617144/45

E.mail : dg-fsi-mah@nic.in

           fsihqm@eth.net

Website : http://www.fsi.gov.in

 

FSI Publications

 

FISHERY SURVEY OF INDIA

Government of India

MUMBAI-400 001

 

Special Publication No.5

 

Abstracts of FSI Publications

FISHERY SURVEY OF INDIA

Government of India

MUMBAI-400 001

 

Occasional paper * 10

Some biological aspect of king fish rachy centron candum (Linnaeus 1766) from the North-west Indian EEZ (August’2000)

- V.S. Somvanshi, S. Varghese, D.K. Gulati and A.K. Bhargava

 King fish, Rachycentron candum, (Linnaeus, 1766) are distributed in tropical warm water regions of Pacific. Atlantic and Indian Ocean. Biological aspects of the king fish from north-western Indian EEZ are undertaken in this study. The aspects dealt with include food and feeding, maturation and spawning, fecundity, sex ratio, length-weight relationship and growth parameters. The food of king fish, as revealed from the stomach contents show that they feed mainly on fin-fishes and cephalopods. Among the fin-fishes identified are barracuda (Sphyraena obtusata), bulls eye (Priacanthus hamrur), scad (Decapterus russelli) and eel (Congresox talabon). A comparison of the diet of male and female king fish shows no significant variation and puffer fish constituted the dominant food item in both cases. Studies on maturation and spawning of king fish show that distribution of ova in different parts of the ovary is uniform and presence of only a single peak of matured ova indicate a short and definite spawning period. The absolute fecundity is estimated to be 19,55,264 whereas its indices in terms of number of ova per gram ovary weight is 2334 and the number of ova per gram body weight is 100. The sex ratio of female to male king fish is 1:1.5. The length-weight relationship for males worked out to W = 0.0096 L 2.8774 and females : W = 0.0036 L 3.1603. The value of growth parameters estimated are Loo = 135.16 cm and K = 0.17 per year. The natural mortality (M) calculated for the species is 0.36. The king fish being caught in varying quantities from a number of localities spread over their wide distributional range in the three major world oceans, it is essential that co-operative research effort among the coastal countries is focused on the crucial aspects of biology and fishery of this curious species.

Occasional paper * 11

Distribution, Abundance and Biology of India - Pacific sail fish Istiophorus plaptypterus (Shaw & Nodder, 1792) in the North Western Indian EEZ (March’2004)

- S. Varghese, V.S. Somvanshi and Sijo P. Varghese

Although exploratory surveys aimed at tuna resources are carried out by long lining in the oceanic sector of Indian EEZ, besides tunas, a number of other fishes like billfishes, sharks and sword fishes are caught as by catches of tuna fishery. The Indo-Pacific sailfish, Istiophorus platypterus is one of such species, which constitute a major by-catch component of the tuna longline catches. The abundance of the species in the North-west sector is evident from the fact that average catch rate obtained has been 39.42 kg / 1000 hooks constituting 15% of the total longline catches. The seasonal variation in the catch shows that the second quarter (April-June) recorded highest catch rate. The spawning season of the species is protractive extending from March-September. The size of first maturity si estimated to be 175cm. Food and feeding behaviour shows that this species feeds non-selectively on cephalopods, bony fishes and crustaceans. The length-weight relationship established gave the equations W = 0.0069 L 1.5596 (Combined). The growth parameters estimated are L ¥ = 316.5 cm, K = 0.39 / year and t0 = (-) 0.512 year. The size of the specimens caught in the longline gear ranged from 100-260 cm (FL).

 

4) Fishery charts/atlas: The following charts/atlas were published:

-Demersal trawl fishery chart of Wadge Bank (1984)

- Atlas of tunas, billfishes and sharks in the Indian EEZ and  adjacent oceanic regions (1988)

- Atlas of tunas, billfishes and sharks in the Indian EEZ around  Andaman & Nicobar islands (December 2000)

Fishery Chart 1* (1984)

DEMERSAL TRAWL FISHERY CHARTS: WADGE BANK

K.M.JOSEPH

The fishery charts are prepared on the basis of demersal trawl survey carried out by Matsya Nireekshani, a 330 GRT fishery survey vessel, from October 1981 to April 1983. Wadge Bank located between lat. 7-8N; long. 7630'-78E and having an area of about 12,000 sq.km was surveyed by a combination of acoustic search and trawling. Seven teen cruises of an average duration of 20 days were carried out, the results of which are presented in the charts. The distribution pattern of important groups of fishes, viz., perches, nemipterids, rays, squid and cuttle fish, carangids, lizard fish, catfish and other fishes are presented.The charts also depict the monthwise catch per hour, percentage composition and percentage of the different groups in relation to the total catch.

Fishery Chart 2* (1988)

ATLAS OF TUNAS, BILLFISHES AND SHARKS IN THE INDIAN EEZ AND ADJACENT OCEANIC REGIONS

D.SUDARSAN, V.S. SOMVANSHI AND M.E. JOHN

Data collected in the investigation of tunas and allied resources by the survey vessels, Matsya Sugundhi and Matsya Harini of Fishery Survey of India and the training vessel M.V. Prashikshani of Central Institute of Fisheries Nautical and Engineering Training formed the basis of this atlas. The specifications of vessels, and longline gear used are presented in detail. The survey conducted during October 1983 to March 1988 in the seas north of equator upto lat. 16N between long. 67E and 96E are considered. The number of hooks operated by each vessel and aggregate sampling effort expended are presented. The major components in longline catch from the Indian seas are listed with their diagnostic characters. The spatial distribution pattern of important resources viz.,yellowfin tuna, bigeye tuna, skipjack, marlin, sail fish, swordfish and sharks are presented as annual as well as monthly charts with a resolution of 1lat. x 1 long. The resource structure is depicted on a quarterly basis for grids of 5lat. x 5long.

 

5) Proceedings:

Proceedings of the papers presented in the MCS workshop held at Goa (February 2003) 

 

Sl. No.

Title of the Paper

Name of the Author

Page No.

PART - I : Indian / NATIONAL PERSPECTIVES

1

Concept of MCS in the concept of maritime States of India : Present and future needs

V.S. Somvanshi

1-15

2

An OverView of Scenario of Fisheries Monitoring, control and surveillance in India

C. Haridas and N.R. Nair

16-21

3

Fisheries Monitoring, Control and Surveillance (MCS) and Indian Coast Guard

Harish C. Birah and R.K. Vishwakarma

22-26

4

Some issues of  Marine Fisheries Management in India

V.S. Murty and N. G.K.Pillai

27-33

5

An Overview of Marine Fisheries Management in India

K. Vijayakumaran and A.K. Bhargava

34-41

6

Fisheries Monitoring, Control and Surveillance  - CIFNET Perspective 

P. Ramanujan

42-50

7

Areas of Interests in Monitoring, Control and surveillance of Marine Fisheries in India

S.K. Naik

51-55

8

Report on Strategies of Management, Control and surveillance of Marine Fisheries

L. Ramalingam

56-60

PART - II : EAST COAST PERSPECTIVES (BAY OF BENGAL)

9

Status of Fisheries Management in Andhra Pradesh

G. Venkata Raju

61-68

10

Marine Fishery Resources of East Coast of India and its Management

K.N.V. Nair

69-73

11

A Brief summary of  Fisheries Management, Monitoring, Control and Surveillance along the Tamilnadu Coast

G. Sathiyamoorthy

74-80

12

Summary Note on Fisheries Management and Monitoring, Control and surveillance in the State of West Bengal

P.K. Chatterjee

81-86

13

Fisheries Mnagement, Monitoring, Control and Surveillance in the State of Orissa

Niten Chandra

87-91

PART - III : WEST COAST PERSPECTIVES (ARABIAN SEA)

14

Fisheries Monitoring, Control and Surveillance in India with Special Reference to Maharashtra State

G.K. Avhad

92-98

15

Fisheries Monitoring, Control and surveillance in Maharashtra State

B.N. Gawali

99-98

16

Monitoring, control and surveillance for Fisheries Management in Gujarat

M.I. Patel

108-126

17

The Legal frame work for Fisheries Monitoring Control and Surveillance (MCS) in Goa

M.E. John

127-132

18

Monitoring, Surveillance and Control of Fisheries in Goa

Usha Desai

133-140

19

Fisheries Management - Monitoring, Control and Surveillance in Karnataka

T. Venkateshappa

145-157

20

Monitoring, Control and Surveillance for Fisheries Management in Kerala

T. Thankappan

145-157

21

Monitoring, Control and Surveillance of Fisheries with Special Reference to Kerala State

K.P. Philip

158-163

PART - IV : MARITIME MAINLAND UNION TERRITORIESPERSPECTIVES

22

Fisheries Management, Control and Surveillance- U.T. Administration of Daman & Diu Fisheries Department,Daman

Abhilasha R. Agrawal

164-169

23

Fisheries Management  - Monitoring Control and Surveillance in the Union Territory of Lakshadweep

C.G. Koya

170-176

PART - V : ARCHIPELAGOES PERSPECTIVES

24

The Report on Fisheries Development in Union Territory of Pondicherry

G. Ramalakshmi

177-179

25

Monitoring, Control and Surveillance of Marine Fisheries in Andaman and Nicobar Islands

Nagesh Ram, E.K. Raveendran,M.Johny,

A.M. Mustaffa,

V.Sheeja and

Rabindernath

180-192

26

Marine Fisheries Monitoring, Control and Surveillance in Andaman & Nicobar

P. Sivaraj

188-192

 

Index

 

193-199

 

Acronyms

 

200

 Proceedings of the International Symposium on “Large Marine Ecosystems: Exploitation and Exploration for sustainable Development and Conservation of fish stocks” held at Kochi 

Sl. No.

Title of the Paper

Name of the Author

Page No.

SESSION - I : EXPLORATORY SURVEYS AND FISH  STOCK ASSESSMENT

1

Progress in exploratory surveys and fish stock assessment with next millennium scenario

V.S. Somvanshi

1-32

2

Distribution and abundance of commercially important demersal fishery resources in upper east coast of Indian EEZ

L. Ramalingam, N. Jagannadh, P. Paul Pandian, J.C.Dhas,

J.C. Dhas, T. Subramanian, P.K. Bhar & M. Vinod Kumar

33-42

3

Biological production and potential fishery resources of the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of India

S.C. Goswami

43-53

4

Benthos and demersal fishery resources assessment in the shelf region of Indian coast

S.N. Harkantra

54-58

5

Stock recruitment relationship of Nemipterus Japonicus along North-west coast of India

V.S. Somvanshi, D.K. Gulati, M.E. John & S. Varghese

59-68

6

Age and growth offour species occurring along North-west coast of India

A.K. Bhargava, S. Varghese, Manali Parab & Amod Tamhane

69-74

7

JPopulation density and condition index of Meretrix meretrix form the coast of Maharashtra State

U.H. Mane & M.A. Patare

75-99

8

Morphometry and biology of the dusky shark, Carcharhinus obscurus (LeSueur), from the oceanic region off the west coast of India

M. Devaraj & Deepak Gulati

100-112

9

Fish resources survey in inshore areas off Dwarka and Jakhau (Gujarat) by 49 footer trawlers

Y.B. Raval, V.J. Thakar, I.C. Jadeja, H.B.Dava & C.R.Trivedi

113-121

SESSION - II : METHODOLOGIES AND TECHNIOUES : INCLUDING REMOTE SENSING

10

Techniques and fishing methods employed for the assessment of fish stocks and their exploitation for sustainable development

M. Shahul Hameed

122-126

11

Bootstrap evaluation of the sampling design to estimate marine fish landings

M. Srinath

127-135

12

Surplus production models for estimating maximum sustainable yield

P. Prajneshu

136-142

13

On non-equilibrium surplus production model for fish stock assessment

R.Venugopalan

143-151

14

A generalized version of surplus production to assess the stock of demersal fishery resources off North-west coast (Gujarat and Maharashtra)

D.K. Gulati, V.S. Somvanshi, A.K. Bhargava & S.K. Dwivedi

152-159

15

Fishery forecasting - Present status and future prospects

M. Srinath

160-165

16

Seasonal and spatial variability in satellite derived thermal and chlorophyll features : A synergistic application for exploring fishery resources

H.U. Solanki, R.M.Dwivedi & S.R.Nayak

166-182

17

Application of remote sensing techniques for locating pelagic fish concentrations along the kerala coast (SW coast of India) and Minicoy waters

V.N. Pillai, M. Sivadas  & K.M. Santosh

183-191

18

Deepsea fishing and new trawl resources of India

K.K. Kunjipalu

192-205

19

An ecofriendly fishing method for exploitation of squid resources 

P. Sivaraj, V. Sivaji & D.M.Ali

206-215

20

Prospects  of line fishing in Andaman and Nicobar waters

P.S. Parasuraman, V.Sivaji, S.A. Rajakumar, M.K.Sajeevan & M.Neelakandan

216-226

21

Of  boundaries - overlaps and variability in LMEs - the case of bay of  Bengal

K. Vijayakumaran

227-238

22

Fish attracting lanterns : Device for resource utilization or destruction

J.B. Rajan

239-251

SESSION - III : RESOURCES UTILISATION

23

Utilisationof the fishery resources in the Indian EEZ

K. Ravindran

256-262

24

Contemporary issues in fish resource utilisation

M.K.R. Nair

263-270

25

Need for new dimensions in marine fisheries development for sustainable management

 A.D. Diwan, R.S. Birandar, J.P. George & M.B. Iftekhar

271-278

26

Status of the gill net fishery for the small pelagic fish species around Sri Lankan coastal waters during 1995-1997

W.P.N. Karunasinghe

279-293

27

The status of lobster fishery in India and options for sustainable management

E.V. Radhakrishnan &M.Vijayakumaran

294-311

28

Commercial exploitation of whale sharks (Rhyncodon typus smith) in Gujarat

P. Pravin, M.JP. Ramesan & K.K. Solanki

312-318

29

Utilisation of oceanic tuna resources in Indian EEZ by foreign fishing vessels operated under charter scheme : A decade’s experience

M.E. John, A.K. Bhargava, Manali Parab & A.S. Kadam

319-327

30

A positive approach for framing a national deepsea fishing policy : suggestions

J.V.H. Dixitulu

328-339

31

Grouper resources of Andaman and Nicobar Island

P.T. Rajan

340-347

32

Fishery harbour development in India : An Introspection

C.T. Betgeri

348-362

Session - IV : LEGAL FRAMEWORK : OPEN ACCESS VS. LIMITED ENTRIES

33.

Legal framework for fishery development and management

S.P.Jagota

363-370

34.

A management perspective for sustainable marine fisheries under globalised scenario

Samar K.Datta & Milindo Chakrabarti

371-405

35.

The EEZ regime and two decades of change in the Indian ocean fisheries

M.E.John & V.S.Somvanshi

406-420

SESSION - V : INTERNATIONAL WATER REGIMES : COMMON HERITAGE OF MANKIND

36.

Some observation on the highly migratory species and straddling stocks occurring in Indian waters and their fishery in the Indian ocean

V.S.Somvanshi & M.E.John

421-432

SESSION - VI : CONSERVATION : INCLUDING ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS, BIODIVERSITY, BY-CATCH AND DISCARDS

37.

Environmental impact assessment - management tool for conservation of large marine ecosystems  

Vijayalakshmi R.Nair

433-447

38

LMEs. ECAs and sustainable management of India’s marine biodiversity : Aconceptual analysis

Prabhas Chandra Sinha

448-481

39.

Arabian Sea oceanography and fisheries

M.Madhupratap & P.Venugopal

482-491

40.

Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) - a viable approach for sustainable resource utilisation from large marine ecosystem off Mumbai

V.V.Singh

492-498

41.

Conservation of marine living resources of Andaman and Nicobar Islands

V.Krishnamurthy & R.Soundarajan

499-506

42.

Diversity and conservation of inertidal gastropods of Mumbai of  Mumbai coast

B.G.Kulakarni &Ashok Jaiswar

507-514

 

43.

The larvae of decapods and fishes of Amba Estuary, Maharashtra

V.T.Paulinose, C.B.Lalithambika Devi, K.Govindan , s.N.Gajbhiye & Vijayalakshmi R. Nair

515-525

44.

Accessory DNA elements as Biodiversity markets

Arnab Sen, A.A.Zynudheen, K.Ashok Kumar, C.N.Ravi Shankar, R.Badonia & K.K.Solanki

526-533

45.

Monoclonal antibodies - Prospects and applications

Arnab Sen, A.A.Zynudheen, R.Badonia & K.K.Solanki

534-540

 

46.

Oceanic sharks as by-catch (?) in tuna longling fishing : Some observations from the Bay of Bengal 

M.E.John & M.Neelakandan

541-548

47.

Krill trawl by- catch  in Indian ocean sector of the Antarctic region during Austral summer 1995-96

A.Anrose, M.R.Boopendranath & M.K.R.Nair

549-559

48.

Impact of square mesh codend on conservation of resources

M.D.Varghese, R.S.manoharadoss & A.K.Kesavan Nair

560-568

49.

Performance evaluation of different types of selective devices for reduction of by-catch in shrimp trawl

N.Subramania Pillai, M.D.Varghese & T.Joseph Mathai

569-576

50.

Effect of separator panels in cod end for by catch separation

V.Vijayan, R.S.Manoharados & T.Joseph Mathai

577-582

51.

Oxygen : Nirogen ratio in the bivalve molluse Meretrix meretrix from the coast of Maharashtra State

U.H.Mane & M.A.Patare

583-593

52.

Present perceptions on fish by-catches

J.V.H.Dixitulu

594-597

53.

Application of biological and technological considerations in management and conservation of the fish stocks

S.Varghese & Manali Parab

598-606

54.

Observations on the effect of bottom trawling on dislocation of non-edible biota in the Palk Bay and Gulf of Mannar, South-east coast of India

I.Jagadis, N.G.Menon &A.Shanmugavel

607-624

55.

Study on Ecological and species diversity of clupeidae (pelagic fishes) in the Persian Gulf

Owfi, Fereidoon

625-644

SESSIN - VII : BIOECONOMICS AND FISHERIES FINANCING : INCLUDING SOCIO- ECONOMIC ASPECTS

56.

Conservation and management of marine fisheries resources : Role of socio-economic factors

N.Subba Rao

645-654

57.

Fisheries management and the role of bio-economics

N.Subba Rao

655-667

58.

Deepsea prawn fishery along the North-east coast of India : A critical appraisal

G.Sudhakara Rao

668-682

59.

Economics of tuna pole and  line operation in Minicoy, Lakshadweep 

M.Sivadas

683-686

60.

Fishery economics for the development of fishery harbours with optimum utilisation of fishery resources

K.Omprakash & G.Ganesan

687-706

61.

Institutional credit support for marine fisheries -status, critical Issues and policy framework 

M.T.Bhartiya

707-712

Proceedings of Tuna Meet - 2003 

Sl. No.

Title of the Paper

Name of the Author

Page No.

SESSION I – INTRODUCTION

1

An Overview of coastal tuna resources and their fisheries in Indian Waters

Mohan Joseph Modayil, N.G. Pillai and U. Ganga

1-10

2

An Overview of oceanic tuna and allied fisheries in the Indian EEZ

V.S. Somvanshi and S. Varghese

11-25

SESSION II - COASTAL TUNA

3

Present status of tuna fisheries of Lakshadweep

K.P. Said Koya, N.G.K. Pillai and M.C. Muthu Koya

26-32

4

Status of tuna fishery in Lakshadweep

Benjamin C. Varghese and C.G. Koya

33-41

5

Stock assessment of coastal tunas along the East coast of India

H.M. Kasim and E.M. Abdussamad

42-53

6

Stock assessment of coastal tunas along the West coast of India

N.G.K. Pillai, U. Ganga, G. Gopakumar, C. Muthiah and Somy Kuriakose

54-57

7

Status of longtail tuna Thunnus tonggol fishery along the North-west coast of India

N.G.K. Pillai, U. Ganga and H.K. Dhokia

58-63

8

Fishery and population characteristics of the bullet tuna, Auxis rochei along South Kerala coast

G. Gopakumar and T.T. Ajithkumar

64-72

9

Status of seerfish fishery in the Indian seas

C. Muthiah and N.G.K. Pillai

73-85

10

Stock assessment of seerfishes along the East coast of India

H.M. Kasim and E.M. Abdussamad

86-96

11

Stock assessment of seerfishes along the West coast of India

C.Muthiah, N.G.K. Pillai, U. Ganga and M. Srinath

97-111

12

An integrated approach to evaluate the present status of the stock of Scomberomorus gattatus along the coasts of Orissa and Andhra Pradesh

V.S. Somvanshi, D.K. Gulati and P. Paul Pandian

112-121

13

Status of exploitation of tuna livebaits of Lakshadweep

K.P. Said Koya and A.K.V. Nasser

122-131

 

14

Distribution of seerfishes as observed from the demersal trawl catches along the Central West coast of India

Puran Singh, M.R. Kokane, D.M. Ali, P. Tamilarasan, N. Unnikrishnan, R.S. Nagpure and J.E. Prabhakar Raj

132-136

15

The size distribution and growth parameters of spotted seerfish, Scomberomorus guttatusi of the upper east coast

P. Paul Pandian, P.K. Bhar, N. Jagannadh, L. Ramalingam, A. Das and K. Gopalakrishnan

137-143

SESSION III - OCEANIC TUNAS

16

Studies on the distribution, abundance and biological of Yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares in the North-west EEZ of India.

Premchand, A. Tiburtius and N.D. Chogale

144-152

17

Fishery and Biological of Yellowfin tuna din Andaman & Nicobar waters

P. Sivaraj, M.K. Sinha, S.A. Rajkumar, A.B. Kar and S.K. Pattanayak

153-167

18

Stock assessment of oceanic skipjack, Katsuwonus pelamis from Minicoy, Lakshadweep

M. Sivadas, K.P. Said Koya and N.G.K. Pillai

168-176

19

Troll line fishery for Yellowfin tuna at Colachel, Kanyakumari Dist.

G. Gopakumar and T.T. Ajithkumar

177-180

20

Distribution, abundance and size of marlins (Makaria & Tetraputrus spp) in Indian waters

A.K. Bhargava, D.E. Uikey, C. Babu and Sijo Varghese

181-190

21

Distribution, abundance indices and some biological characteristics of Indo-pacific sailfish, I. platypterus (Shaw & Nodder, 1792) in the north-western Indian EEZ)

S. Varghese, V.S. Somvanshi, D.K. Gulati, Sijo P. Varghese and Biju Joseph Parakkal

191-208

22

Catch indices of bill fishes (Fam, Istiophoridae and Xiphidae) from commercial long line fishery of Bay of Bengal

J.E. Prabhakar Raj, M.E. John and D.M. Ali

209-215

23

Distribution, abundance and biology of Indo-Pacific sailfish in Andaman sea

P. Sivaraj, S.A. Rajkumar, M.K. Sinha, A.B. Kar and S.K. Pattnayak

216-225

 

 6)Chartered Vessels Information Series:

For details about the chartered vessels information series  please contact Fishery Survey of India Headquarters, Mumbai or base offices.

7)Preliminary Reports of different Cruise:

For details about the preliminary reports of different cruise  please contact Fishery Survey of India Headquarters, Mumbai or base offices.

8)Progress Reports :

For details about the progress reports  please contact Fishery Survey of India Headquarters, Mumbai or base offices.

9)Annual Reports :

Annual Report for the year 2008-09 -  Please Click here
Annual Report for the year 2009-10 -  Please Click here
Annual Report for the year 2010-11 -  Please Click here
Annual Report for the year 2011-12 -  Please Click here
Annual Report for the year 2012-13 -  Please Click here
Annual Report for the year 2013-14 -  Please Click here

10) Marine Census-2005 :

A report on Marine Census 2005 in Andaman & Nicobar Islands, and Lakshadweep Islands -  Please Click here

11) Hand Book for Taxonomy - May 2009 :

Hand Book for Taxonomy - May 2009 -  Please Click here

12) Resource Information Series (RIS) :

Mormugao Base:  Results of Fishery Resources Survey along the Central West Coast of India during April-June 209  -  Please Click here
Visakhapatnam Base:  Resource Information Series - January to March 2009  -  Please Click here

13) Informative Charts of FSI - 2010 :

1.    Brief History, Mandate and Organization Structure  -  Please Click here
2.    Satellite Remote Sensing Fisheries Applications and Adoption of Remote Sensing Technology  -  Please Click here
3.    Multifilament Tuna Long Lining, Monofilament Tuna Long Lining and Oceanic Resources  -  Please Click here
4.    Eco-friendly fishing methods  -  Please Click here
5.    Pelagic Trawling, Purse-seining and Pelagic Resources  -  Please Click here
6.    Survey Fleet  -  Please Click here
7.    Demersal Trawling and Demersal Resources  -  Please Click here
8.    Human Resources Development (HRD)  -  Please Click here
9.    Indian Fisheries at a Glance  -  Please Click here
10.  Acoustic Survey  -  Please Click here
11.  Major contributions towards Marine Fisheries Development  -  Please Click here
12.  Futuristic Vision  -  Please Click here
13.  2010 - International Year of Biodiversity - Please Click here

            

This page was modified at 02:00 PM on 18-04-2016